4
\$\begingroup\$

Here's the code

max="$1"
date
echo "url: $2
rate: $max calls / second"
START=$(date +%s);

get () {
  curl -s -v "$1" 2>&1 | tr '\r\n' '\\n' | awk -v date="$(date +'%r')" '{print $0"\n-----", date}' >> /tmp/perf-test.log
}

while true
do
  echo $(($(date +%s) - START)) | awk '{print int($1/60)":"int($1%60)}'
  sleep 1

  for i in `seq 1 $max`
  do
    get $2 &
  done
done

This can be run as

sh load-test.sh 20 "http://api.myserver.com/get_info"

Please suggest if you think there's a way to take in multiple curl options.

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

Arithmetics in Bash

You're doing some math in Bash, some in Awk, some in a combination of both. You can do all of that in Bash alone. Most notably, instead of this:

echo $(($(date +%s) - START)) | awk '{print int($1/60)":"int($1%60)}'

This would be equivalent, but all in Bash, without additional processes:

((delta = $(date +%s) - START))
((minutes = delta / 60))
((seconds = delta % 60))
echo $minutes:$seconds

Don't use seq

seq is not portable, I suggest to avoid it. Instead of this:

 for i in `seq 1 $max`; do ...; done

You can write:

for ((i = 1; i < max; i++)); do ...; done

Don't use `...`

This syntax is obsolete today, always use $(...) instead.

Other minor things

This would be clearer as two echo lines, or a here-document with cat <<EOF:

echo "url: $2
rate: $max calls / second"

The trailing semicolon is unnecessary:

START=$(date +%s);

The quoting is unnecessary in date +'%r', but it does no harm.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ seq is very common in Linux these days. \$\endgroup\$ – chicks Mar 4 '16 at 15:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ I prefer my scripts to run everywhere \$\endgroup\$ – janos Mar 4 '16 at 16:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ Every comment you made is valid, I over-looked them. Any word on the loooong curl command. It itches me but i couldn't do much. \$\endgroup\$ – bigOmega Mar 6 '16 at 19:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @bigΩmega well, I'm wondering if you need the tr at all. I think you can simply drop that from the pipeline but I'm not sure. You can give that a try. \$\endgroup\$ – janos Mar 6 '16 at 20:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @janos So without that tr i only get the first line out of the pipe \$\endgroup\$ – bigOmega Mar 7 '16 at 6:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.