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I've implemented the beginnings of a Python preprocesser I plan to implement sometime in the future, and the below code is my simple prototype. At the moment, it only converts until and unless statements.

py_preproc.py

"""
A simple Python utility that converts
non-valid Python code, like `until`,
and `unless` blocks to valid Python 
code.
"""
from sys import argv


try:
    file_path = argv[1]
    execute_results = argv[2]
except IndexError:
    raise Exception("Two argv arguments are required, file_path, and execute_results.")


def open_code_file():
    """
    Opens the code file to do the conversion
    on, and returns the read version as a
    string.
    """
    with open(file_path, "r+") as code_file:
        return code_file.read()


def replace_items(file_string):
    """
    Replace specific pieces of the code_file
    with valid Python code. Currently only
    `until`, and `unless` blocks are replaced.
    """
    return file_string.replace(
        "until", "while not"
    ).replace(
        "unless", "if not"
    )


def evaluate_result(result_string):
    """
    Evaluates the converted result, after
    the code has been converted to valid
    Python code.
    """
    py_string_compiled = compile(result_string, "fakemodule", "exec")
    exec(py_string_compiled)


def main():
    file_string = open_code_file()
    new_file_string = replace_items(file_string)

    if execute_results == "-true":
        evaluate_result(new_file_string)

    elif execute_results == "-false":
        with open(file_path) as file_to_write:
            file_to_write.truncate()
            file_to_write.write(new_file_string)

    else:
        raise Exception("Invalid argument \"{argument}\".".format(argument=execute_results))


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

For reference, here's an example of a code file using until and unless, before it's preprocessed.

iterator = 10

until iterator == 0:
    print(iterator)
    iterator -= 1


unless iterator != 0:
    print("iterator == 0")

The above example is then converted to this:

iterator = 10

while not iterator == 0:
    print(iterator)
    iterator -= 1


if not iterator != 0:
    print("iterator == 0")

Finally, here's the command line syntax for running the command, where file_to_execute_or_convert.py is the Python file that you want to run or convert, and execute_or_write is -true if you want to just execute it, or -false if you want to convert it.

python py_preproc.py [file_to_execute_or_convert.py] [execute_or_write]
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    \$\begingroup\$ This is very brittle, it will replace strings where it shouldn't. For instance, try your script on itself. \$\endgroup\$ – RemcoGerlich Jun 29 '15 at 7:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ This seems exceptionally relevant: stackoverflow.com/q/214881/3001761 \$\endgroup\$ – jonrsharpe Jun 29 '15 at 8:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ @RemcoGerlich I don't think you are right. Running a preprocessor on itself, if for pure luck it is written in the same language it processes, is probably the most silly test case you can come up with. And since they are keywords they can't be used for variable names or whatever (excluding the preprocessor ofc, that's why you shouldn't test it on itself). \$\endgroup\$ – Vladimir Cravero Jun 29 '15 at 10:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ Note: you should use while not (iterator == 0) and if not (iterator == 0). Otherwise if the user uses a condition like unless x and y it then becomes while not x and y which is equivalent to while (not x) and y. But then you can't simply use replace anymore... \$\endgroup\$ – Bakuriu Jun 29 '15 at 11:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ @VladimirCravero: I was looking for a simple example that used "until" inside a string literal, and the code itself was an example of that. That it is reserved doesn't matter either, because this script will also change the variable name run_until_completed into run_while not_completed. And what Bakuriu said. \$\endgroup\$ – RemcoGerlich Jun 29 '15 at 12:34
14
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  1. Remco Gerlich is quite right to point out that this preprocessor does not work on general Python code, because it uses string replacement. Thus unless will be changed to if not in strings (such as regular expressions, templates, and docstrings), potentially breaking the code. The preprocessor itself is just one example of the kind of code which will be broken: it is not good enough to respond that this concern is "silly".

  2. Additionally, Bakuriu is quite right to point out that the transformation of unless to if not is inadequate: it only works on very simple examples. But consider:

    a unless b or c else d
    

    which would be changed to:

    a if not b or c else d
    

    where the condition is wrong, because not b or c parses as (not b) or c. The correct transformation is:

    a if not (b or c) else d
    

    This problem makes it hopeless to attempt this preprocessing at the level of text, or even of tokens: you need a parser to find the end of the condition. Consider an expression like:

    a unless b or (c unless d and e else f) else g
    

    which needs to be transformed into:

    a if not (b or (c if not (d and e) else f)) else g
    
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7
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I can see you've tried to guard against module execution by using if __name__ == '__main__', but I believe the try except block at the beginning of the file will be executed on module import. This may go awry if you import your module and try to use/test its functions in a library fashion.

You could consider using the Python argparse module to handle arguments within your main(). It will handle common idioms like -argumentname value for you (or simply map first argument to inputfile, second argument to outputfile for example if you prefer), provide a default help text, allow you to sanitise values with callbacks, allow you to refer to the arguments in code by field name rather than index and so on.

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6
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Your code looks really good, and there's very little I can see here that can be improved, nonetheless, the show goes on.


with open(file_path, "r+") as code_file:
    return code_file.read()

I can't see that you re-use code_file again to save, meaning plain r is acceptable, over r+, but as @QPaysTaxes pointed out in the comments, if provided an empty file path, the empty file would be created, and that would be run, so displaying an error here would be a good idea.


The .replace().replace() can be improved, I had the following solution in mind:

return file_string.replace(
    "until", "while not"
).replace(
    "unless", "if not"
)

into:

changes = {
     "until": "while not",
     "unless": "if not",
   }
return [file_string.replace(k, v) for k, v in changes.items()]

I think it'd be best if you set execute_results by default to false, as it's better than returning an error with a flag, if the flag is empty, because those kinda flags are usually optional, right?

execute_results = argv[2]

Possibly into the following, if you can accept it's malformed appearance.

execute_results = argv[2] if argv[2] else "-false"

(Thanks @frerich-raabe for the suggestion)


I can't really see anything other than that, well done!

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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ ...Doesn't r+ create the file if it's not there? \$\endgroup\$ – Nic Hartley Jun 29 '15 at 5:10
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    \$\begingroup\$ Well, my point is that reuse doesn't matter -- r+ shouldn't be used, but it shouldn't be used because you should throw an error. \$\endgroup\$ – Nic Hartley Jun 29 '15 at 5:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Quill My point is that in order to test whether a string is empty, you can just use the string itself: empty strings evaluate to False, i.e. you can use execute_results = argv[2] if argv[2] else "-false"; PEP8 explains: "For sequences, (strings, lists, tuples), use the fact that empty sequences are false.". \$\endgroup\$ – Frerich Raabe Jun 29 '15 at 14:42

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