9
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It's a simple version of LZW compression algorithm with 12 bit codes. I want to know what's good and what's bad about this code. Be as picky as you like.

//  Compile with gcc 4.7.2 or later, using the following command line:
//
//    g++ -std=c++0x lzw.c -o lzw
//
//LZW algorithm implemented using fixed 12 bit codes.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <fstream>

#include <bitset>
#include <string>
#include <unordered_map>

#define MAX_DEF 4096

using namespace std;

string convert_int_to_bin(int number)
{
    string result = bitset<12>(number).to_string();
    return result;
}

void compress(string input, int size, string filename) {
    unordered_map<string, int> compress_dictionary(MAX_DEF);
    //Dictionary initializing with ASCII
    for ( int unsigned i = 0 ; i < 256 ; i++ ){
    compress_dictionary[string(1,i)] = i;
    }
    string current_string;
    unsigned int code;
    unsigned int next_code = 256;
    //Output file for compressed data
    ofstream outputFile;
    outputFile.open(filename + ".lzw");

    for(char& c: input){
    current_string = current_string + c;
    if ( compress_dictionary.find(current_string) ==compress_dictionary.end() ){
            if (next_code <= MAX_DEF)
                compress_dictionary.insert(make_pair(current_string, next_code++));
            current_string.erase(current_string.size()-1);
            outputFile << convert_int_to_bin(compress_dictionary[current_string]);
            current_string = c;
        }   
    }   
    if (current_string.size())
            outputFile << convert_int_to_bin(compress_dictionary[current_string]);
    outputFile.close();
}



void decompress(string input, int size, string filename) {
    unordered_map<unsigned int, string> dictionary(MAX_DEF);
    //Dictionary initializing with ASCII
    for ( int unsigned i = 0 ; i < 256 ; i++ ){
    dictionary[i] = string(1,i);
    }
    string previous_string;
    unsigned int code;
    unsigned int next_code = 256;
    //Output file for decompressed data
    ofstream outputFile;
    outputFile.open(filename + "_uncompressed.txt");

    int i =0;
    while (i<size){
        //Extracting 12 bits and converting binary to decimal
        string subinput = input.substr(i,12);
        bitset<12> binary(subinput);
        code = binary.to_ullong();
        i+=12;

        if ( dictionary.find(code) ==dictionary.end() ) 
            dictionary.insert(make_pair(code,(previous_string + previous_string.substr(0,1))));
        outputFile<<dictionary[code];
        if ( previous_string.size())
            dictionary.insert(make_pair(next_code++,previous_string + dictionary[code][0])); 
        previous_string = dictionary[code];
        }
    outputFile.close();
}

string convert_char_to_string(const char *pCh, int arraySize){
    string str;
    if (pCh[arraySize-1] == '\0') str.append(pCh);
    else for(int i=0; i<arraySize; i++) str.append(1,pCh[i]);
    return str;
}

static void show_usage()
{
        cerr << "Usage: \n"
              << "Specify the file that needs to be compressed or decompressed\n"
              <<"lzw -c input    #compress file input\n"
              <<"lzw -d input    #decompress file input\n"
              <<"Compressed data will be found in a file with the same name but with a .lzw extension\n"
              <<"Decompressed data can be found in a file with the same name and a _uncompressed.txt extension\n"
              << endl;
}


int main (int argc, char* argv[]) {
    streampos size;
    char * memblock;

    if (argc <2)
    {
        show_usage();   
        return(1);
    }
    ifstream file (argv[2], ios::in|ios::binary|ios::ate);
    if (file.is_open())
    {
        size = file.tellg();
        memblock = new char[size];
        file.seekg (0, ios::beg);
        file.read (memblock, size);
        file.close();
        string input = convert_char_to_string(memblock,size);
        if (string( "-c" ) == argv[1] )
            compress(input,size, argv[2]);
        else if (string( "-d" ) == argv[1] )
            decompress(input,size, argv[2]);
        else
            show_usage();
    }
    else {
    cout << "Unable to open file."<<endl;
    show_usage();
    }
    return 0;
}
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9
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Here are some things I see that may help you improve your code.

Shouldn't a compressed file be smaller?

Imagine my surprise when I discovered that a 4057-byte file (the source code itself) became 18720 bytes when compressed! Then I looked at the "compressed" file and saw that it was composed of ASCII '1' and '0' characters rather than binary. If that had been converted to binary output, that would be 2340 bytes which actually is smaller than the input. I'd suggest emitting binary rather than ASCII representation of binary which is 8x the size.

Pass by const reference where practical

The first argument to compress is a std::string but that causes the entire input buffer to be duplicated. Better would be to make it const std::string & because it is not modified and it doesn't need to be duplicated. The for loop then becomes

for(const char c: input) {
    // ...
}

Note that this is a const char not const char & because on most machines it's quicker and smaller to simply use a char rather than a reference to one.

The filename argument should also be const string &.

Remember to free allocated memory

The program should delete[] memblock at the end of main. Better yet, see the following suggestion

Eliminate buggy convert_char_to_string()

The code for converting from a char pointer to a string as currently in the code is this:

string convert_char_to_string(const char *pCh, int arraySize){
    string str;
    if (pCh[arraySize-1] == '\0') 
        str.append(pCh);
    else 
        for(int i=0; i<arraySize; i++) 
            str.append(1,pCh[i]);
    return str;
}

However this has a few problems. First is the bug that occurs if the passed buffer has two '\0' characters in it, one of which is at the end. The bug is that this code will only copy up to the first '\0' character, silently truncating the input buffer. The second problem is the loop. As written, it will probably reallocate and copy the contents of str many times as it grows. That pointlessly slows the program because you already know how big the string should be. Better still would be to eliminate it entirely, and eliminate memblock by copying the file directly into the string:

string input = string(std::istreambuf_iterator<char>(file),
    std::istreambuf_iterator<char>());

Note that there are faster ways to do this, but none as succinct.

Use C++11 compile switches

The program uses C++ 11 constructs, so I'd recommend changing the command-line compilation suggestion in the commment to this instead:

g++ -std=c++11 lzw.c -o lzw

Prefer constexpr to old-style #define

Rather than using a #define for MAX_DEF the code could use a constexpr:

constexpr std::size_t MAX_DEF = 4096;

It doesn't make a lot of difference here, but generally the advantage is that the value has an associated type. Where it does make a difference is in the next suggestion:

Make relationships between constants explicit

The numbers 12 and 4096 in the program are associated, but that association is implicit rather than explicit. It would be better to make the relationship between the two constants explicit:

constexpr std::size_t BITS=12;
constexpr std::size_t MAX_DEF=1<<BITS;

Now all places that currently use the "magic number" 12 should use the constant BITS instead. Better still, would be to have a Compressor class for which these would be member variables, and compress and decompress would be member functions.

Avoid using the same unnamed constant multiple times

The code currently initializes compress_dictionary and then sets next_code to 256. This would be a little more straightforward and avoids having the same constant multiple places in the same routine:

unsigned next_code;
for ( next_code = 0 ; next_code < 256 ; next_code++ ){
    compress_dictionary[string(1,next_code)] = next_code;
}

This is advantageous because there is no way to make a mistake in typing the constant two different ways. A similar change should be made to decompress which also eliminates another ugly peculiarity, which is to have declared i as two different types within the same function.

Use a for loop instead of while where it makes sense

In the decompress routine, the while loop would be better expressed as a for loop. Instead of this:

int i = 0;
while (i<size){
    //
    i+=12;
    //
}

Use this:

for (int i=0; i < size; i += BITS) {
    // 
}

Bail out early on error

The code currently checks to see if the file is open and then has an else clause way at the bottom of main to handle an error. Better would be to bail out early on error, and not enclose the entire program in an if clause:

if (!file)
{
    cout << "Unable to open file." << endl;
    show_usage();
}

Also note that I've used !file for the condition. This is the usual C++ idiom for file error checking.

Use all appropriate #includes

The program uses make_pair which is actually defined in <utility>. For that reason, there should be a line

    #include <utility>

Eliminate unused variables

The code variable in compress is not used. Also, the size parameter is not used, but it should be. I'd recommend eliminating code and size. If you need the size, as for the decompress routine, you can simply use input.size().

Omit return 0

When a C++ program reaches the end of main the compiler will automatically generate code to return 0, so there is no reason to put return 0; explicitly at the end of main.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Excellent, but I'd also add a suggestion of emitting only used code instead of all 256. This can make low color images/data compress even better. This is roughly how GIF works. \$\endgroup\$ – phyrfox Apr 12 '15 at 5:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ @phyrfox: I'm not sure I understand your suggestion. The dictionary is not emitted; only used code are. \$\endgroup\$ – Edward Apr 12 '15 at 12:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'd simply advise creating a dictionary based on used symbols, and emit this dictionary as part of the file (and load on decompression). Starting with eight bit codes might not always be efficient. Text files would arguably benefit, as well as images with fewer colors. For example, you could probably save two bits per code with a typical text file from the start. Emitting the dictionary could be done in just eight bytes, which could pay for itself in a file as small as 12 bytes. \$\endgroup\$ – phyrfox Apr 12 '15 at 12:41

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