4
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1-20 of K&R Exercise 1-20

Write a program detab that replaces tabs in the input with the proper number of blanks to space to the next tab stop. Assume a fixed set of tab stops, say every n columns.

I think my solution is okay. I used the name getlinea when it also "completes" a line when returning from function getlinea because it found a \t.

When I look at the code with

$ cat main.c

And I select the tab spaces of my code that terminal prints, I see indentation spaces as a whole thing, but when I go

$ ./1-20_detab < main.c

I can see the tabs spaces as for regular (not tab) spaces.

/*
 * main.c
 *
 *  Created on: 22/3/2015
 *      Author: utnso
 *
 *Exercise 1-20. Write a program detab that replaces tabs in the input with the proper number
  of blanks to space to the next tab stop. Assume a fixed set of tab stops, say every n columns.
  Should n be a variable or a symbolic parameter?
 *
 * Answer: n should be a symbolic parameter
 *
 * Note: 1 )It doesn't say anything about input being lines, i assume they're for simplicity, when testing the program
 *       2 ) this program also deletes white lines
 */

#include <stdio.h>

#define W_AS_TABS 4

#define MAXLINE 1000

int c;
int len ;

int getlinea ( char line [] );
void replace_tabs ( char tab [] );

int main ( void )
{
    extern int len ;
    len = 0 ;
    extern int c;
    char line [MAXLINE] ;
    while ( ( len = getlinea ( line ) ) >= 0 ) //getlinea gives a new line or completes a line interrupted when getlinea exited because it found a tab.
        if ( c == '\t')
            replace_tabs ( line ) ;
        else
            if ( len != 0 )
            {  //not an empty line
                printf ("%s\n", line);//if it's the end of a line, show it! ...
                len = 0 ; // gimme a new line
            }
    return 0;
}

int getlinea ( char line [] )
{
    extern int c;
    extern int len;
    while ( ( c = getchar () ) != EOF && c != '\n' && c!= '\t' && len < MAXLINE-1 )
    {
        line [len] = c;
        ++ len;
    }
    if ( c != '\t' )
        line [len] = '\0';
    if ( c == EOF )
        return -1;
    return len;
}

void replace_tabs ( char s [] )
{
    extern int len;
    int i ;
    for ( i = 0; i < 4  && len < MAXLINE-2 ; ++i ){ //save a position for \0
            s [len] = 32;
            ++ len;
    }
}

This is the output for

$ ./1-20_detab < main.c

/*
 * main.c
 *
 *  Created on: 22/3/2015
 *      Author: utnso
 *
 *Exercise 1-20. Write a program detab that replaces tabs in the input with the proper number
  of blanks to space to the next tab stop. Assume a fixed set of tab stops, say every n columns.
  Should n be a variable or a symbolic parameter?
 *
 * Answer: n should be a symbolic parameter
 *
 * It doesn't say anything about input being lines, i assume they're for  >simplicity, when testing the program
 *
 */

#include <stdio.h>

#define W_AS_TABS 4

#define MAXLINE 1000

int c;
int len ;

int getlinea ( char line [] );
void replace_tabs ( char tab [] );

int main ( void )
{
  extern int len ;
  len = 0 ;
  extern int c;
  char line [MAXLINE] ;
  while ( ( len = getlinea ( line ) ) >= 0 ) //getlinea gives a new line or completes a line interrupted when getlinea exited because it found a tab.

      if ( c == '\t')
          replace_tabs ( line ) ;
      else
          if ( len != 0 )
          {  //not an empty line
              printf ("%s\n", line);//if it's the end of a line, show it! 
              len = 0 ; // gimme a new line
          }
  return 0;
}

int getlinea ( char line [] )
{
  extern int c;
  extern int len;
  while ( ( c = getchar () ) != EOF && c != '\n' && c!= '\t' && len < MAXLINE-1 )
  {
      line [len] = c;
      ++ len;
  }
  if ( c != '\t' )
      line [len] = '\0';
  if ( c == EOF )
      return -1;
  return len;
}

void replace_tabs ( char s [] )
{
  extern int len;
  int i ;
  for ( i = 0; i < 4  && len < MAXLINE-2 ; ++i ){ //save a position for \0
          s [len] = 32;
          ++ len;
  }
}
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  • \$\begingroup\$ data is only marked 'extern' if it is in another file, When the data is in the global/file global address sapce, as 'c' and 'len' are, the extern is not needed and only create confusion;l When the variables are visible to the program (as those variable are) then the individual functions can/should just use them with out trying to re-define them \$\endgroup\$ – user3629249 Mar 22 '15 at 22:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ you are right @user3629249 here is what Kerningham says about it: "In certain circumstances, the extern declaration can be omitted. If the definition of the external variable occurs in the source file before its use in a particular function, then there is no need for an extern declaration in the function. The extern declarations in main, getline and copy are thus redundant. In fact, common practice is to place definitions of all external variables at the beginning of the source file, and then omit all extern declarations. " TY! \$\endgroup\$ – fzappaandthem Mar 22 '15 at 23:10
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Not everybody uses a tab size of 4

#define W_AS_TABS 4

Might by worth setting this as a default. But the user should be able to change the default.

Global variables are not a good idea:

int c;
int len ;

Prefer to pass as parameters to your function.

Not all lines end with a new line character.

  if ( c == EOF )
      return -1;
  return len;

The last line in a file may not work correctly if it is not terminated by a \n.

This is not a correct way to replace tabs.

void replace_tabs ( char s [] )
{
  extern int len;
  int i ;
  for ( i = 0; i < 4  && len < MAXLINE-2 ; ++i ){ //save a position for \0
          s [len] = 32;
          ++ len;
  }
}

You always replace a tab with four spaces. You should replace a tab with the number of spaces to get you to the next tab stop. So a tab character at position 22 and a tab stop of 4 should add only two spaces to get the insert point to position 24.

=======================================================

Added answers to the questions in the comments.

while ( ( c = getchar () ) != EOF && c != '\n' && c!= '\t' && len < MAXLINE-1 )... All lines end up with \n or 998 characters long or EOF...

Yes that bit works.

it has no problem when the final line doesn't end with \n (I tested that)

Are you sure?

if ( c == EOF )
    return -1;

When the last line does not have a '\n' character the return value will be -1. Which means it will not be printed because the main() function has.

while ( ( len = getlinea ( line ) ) >= 0 )

Thus it never enters the part where it does the printing.

Here is my test (and it fails)

# This works as expected because there
# is a new line on the end.
> echo bob is waiting > test1
> cat test1 | ./a.out
bob is waiting

# This fails.
# We create a file were the last line has no '\n'
# The result is no output.
> echo -n "bob is waiting" > test
> cat test | ./a.out

2... len is a global variable so replace_tabs ( line ) can modify this value, and getlinea "knows" it doesn't need to start "getting a new line everytime it's invoked"

I can see how it works.
Does not change the fact that it is bad practice. Global mutable state makes functions harder to reason about (as other functions can mutate the state when you are not looking). Passing a value as a parameter allows you to control the state better.

Could you please explain last paragraph? I didn't quite get it.

Tab characters are not 4 characters long.

They are the length of required to get to the tab stop. So if you have a tab size of 4. Then you have tab stops at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28 ....

So when you replace a tab you don't replace it with four spaces. You replace it with the number of spaces required to get the next character to tab stop.

So if you find a tab at position 22 (ie there are 21 characters in front of it). Then you should replace the tab with only 2 spaces to make the next inserted character appear at position 24 (the next tab stop).

=======================================================

If i replace the tab with two whites characters then It's OK? doesn't make a lot of sense to me.

> echo "XLine1   // Line beginning with tab" | tr 'X' '\t' > test
> echo "  XLine2   // Line beginning with 2 spaces then a tab" | tr 'X' '\t' >> test

If you edit this file in an editor, then the first L on each line will line up one above the other; try it.

> cat test
        Line1   // Line beginning with tab
        Line2   // Line beginning with 2 spaces then a tab

If you run this file through your program. Then the Ls no longer line up. You have broken the indentation of the file. The whole point of the exercise is to make sure you maintain indentation.

> cat test | ./a.out
    Line1   // Line beginning with tab
      Line2   // Line beginning with 2 spaces then a tab

=======================================================

If you don't do the indentation correctly (as I describe above). You can simplify your current program too:

 int main()
 {
      while( ( c = getchar () ) != EOF) {
          if (c != '\t') {
               printf("%c", c);
          }
          else {
               printf("    ");
          }
      }
 }
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  • \$\begingroup\$ while ( ( c = getchar () ) != EOF && c != '\n' && c!= '\t' && len < MAXLINE-1 )... All lines end up with \n or 998 characters long or EOF... it has no problem when the final line doesn't end with \n (I tested that) ... len is a global variable so replace_tabs ( line ) can modify this value, and getlinea "knows" it doesn't need to start "getting a new line everytime it's invoked" ... same thing with global variable c, replace_tabs also needs c's value because that way it can behave correctly when it needs to. Could you please explain last paragraph? I didn't quite get it. TY! \$\endgroup\$ – fzappaandthem Mar 23 '15 at 5:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ sorry @loki astari, i was editing, i'm really new at this so i confuse what Intro and Shift + Intro do. \$\endgroup\$ – fzappaandthem Mar 23 '15 at 5:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ @fzappaandthem: Added more content to question. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin York Mar 23 '15 at 5:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ TY so much for your answer it was very helpful and detailed: 1) If i replace the tab with two whites characters then It's OK? doesn't make a lot of sense to me. 2) The way the program is built is ugly, I see how it can be a bad practice to use global variables: in while ((len = getlinea())>= 0) ... i'm being just stupid,I mean,I'm using the global variable len and then no matter what it does in getlinea's loop (which modifies length of current line -len-) it just returns a -1 if it found EOF so if len != 0 will print even if len==-1;that's in while's body and will never get in! \$\endgroup\$ – fzappaandthem Mar 23 '15 at 15:49
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @fzappaandthem: One more update with an explanation. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin York Mar 23 '15 at 16:29
0
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This is my final code, I hope is good. TY @loki astari ! it works with all tests I made so far... It does a little strange thing with the tests you suggested (leaves an empty line at the end, no idea why!)

/*
 * main.c
 *
 *  Created on: 24/3/2015
 *      Author: utnso
 *
 *
 */

#include <stdio.h>

#define W_AS_TABS 4

#define MAXLINE 1000

int get_indented_line ( char line [] );
int replace_tabs ( char tab [], int len );
int next_tab_stop (int i);

int main ( void )
{
    int len = 0 ;
    char line [MAXLINE] ;

    while ( len >= 0 )
    {
        len = get_indented_line ( line );
        if ( len != 0 )//not an empty line
            printf ("%s\n", line);//if you got a full line, show it ...!
    }
    return 0;
}

int get_indented_line ( char line [] )
{
    int c, i;
    i = 0;
    while ( ( c = getchar () ) != EOF && c != '\n' && i < MAXLINE-1 )
    {
        if ( c == '\t' )
            i = replace_tabs ( line , i );
        else
        {
            line [i] = c;
            ++ i;
        }
    }
    line [i] = '\0';
    if ( c == EOF )
        return -1;
    return i;
}

int replace_tabs ( char s [], int len )
{
    int lim = next_tab_stop ( len );
    while ( len <= lim && len < MAXLINE-1 )
    {
        s [len] = 32;
        ++len;
    }
    return len ;
}

int next_tab_stop ( int i)
{
    ++ i; //I need next tab stop, so if len is a "tab stop position" I force the function to find the next one
    while ( i % W_AS_TABS > 0 )
        ++i;
    return i;
}
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