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I'm writing some table.tools to make table handling a little easier for me. But I'm a beginner with Lua, so you might help me a bit, to make the code better.

First of all I would like to get the best usability, but performance is a factor as well.

-- is compare equal to AT_LEASE one entry of list_to_search_in?
-- the idea was to make syntax like 
--" if value == var1 or value == var2 or value == var(n) "
--- a little shorter

function table.contains(list_to_search_in, compare)

     for k,v in pairs(list_to_search_in) do
        if compare == v then
            return true
        end
      end

      return false
end

    -- is compare equal to EVERY entry of list_to_search_in ?

function table.equalsAll(list_to_search_in, compare)
    local counter = 0
    local truth_counter = 0

    for k,v in pairs(list_to_search_in) do
        if compare == v then
            truth_counter = truth_counter + 1
        end
        counter = counter + 1
    end

    return (truth_counter == counter)
end

    -- compare is equal to HOW_MANY entrys of list_to_search_in?
    -- returns how many entrys are the same

function table.count(list_to_search_in, compare)
    local counter = 0

    for k,v in pairs(list_to_search_in) do
        if compare == v then
            counter = counter + 1
        end
    end
    return counter
end

    -- compare is equal to WHICH entrys of list_to_search_in?
    -- returns a map of equality

function table.truthmap(list_to_search_in, compare)
    local map = { }

    for k,v in pairs(list_to_search_in) do
        table.insert(map, { k , compare == v})
    end
    return map
end 

    -- deletes all entys in list, wich equals(or not[,invert]) to compare value
    -- returns a table with all entrys wich have not been equal

function table.removePerValue(list_to_search_in, compare, invert)
    local counter = 0
    local return_table = {}

    for k,v in pairs(list_to_search_in) do

        if invert and (v == compare) then 
            table.insert(return_table, v)
        elseif not invert and (v ~= compare) then
            table.insert(return_table, v)
        end
    end

    return return_table
end

(Feel free to use, I'm happy if the code helps someone)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can you explain what removePerValue does? \$\endgroup\$ – hjpotter92 Sep 11 '14 at 12:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ returns a table that contains every entry of the given table, except every entry with the given value. example: table.remove({1,1,1,2,3,4,2}, 2) returns: {1,1,1,3,4} or: table.remove({1,1,1,2,3,4,2}, 2, true) returns: {2,2} \$\endgroup\$ – Sempie Sep 11 '14 at 12:58
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  • contains

    The function is fine.

  • equalsAll

    Since you are checking that all the items in table are the same, you can simply return false if any one of them does not match. The worst case scenario would be \$ O(n) \$, otherwise you'd get the check very quick.

    function table.equalsAll(list_to_search_in, compare)
        for k,v in pairs(list_to_search_in) do
            if compare ~= v then
                return false
            end
        end
        return true
    end
    
  • count

    The incrementing can be achieved in a single statement:

    counter = compare == v and counter + 1 or counter
    
  • truthmap

    The function is highly esoteric, and I'm unsure about its applications. Although, you can make your map to reflect the input table as follows:

    map[k] = compare == v
    
  • removePerValue

    I'd suggest adding a filtering callback.

The function would look like:

function table.filter( tInput, CallBack )
    local tFilter = {}
    for k, v in pairs(tInput) do
        if CallBack(v) then tFilter[k] = v end
        -- or table.insert( tFilter, v )
        -- as per your needs
    end
    return tFilter
end
function table.removePerValue(list_to_search_in, compare, invert)
    local fn = function(a) if invert then return compare == a else return compare ~= a end end
    return table.filter(list_to_search_in, fn)
end

And the usage will be like:

table.removePerValue({1,1,1,2,3,4,2}, 2, true) -- returns {[4]=2,[7]=2}
table.removePerValue({1,1,1,2,3,4,2}, 2)       -- returns {1,1,1,[5]=3,[6]=4}

The filtering will allow you to encapsulate more features such as selecting values \$\geq\$, \$\leq\$ etc. only. Or some other complicated logical operations. A sample would be as follows:

table.filter({1,1,1,2,3,4,2}, function(a) return a >= 3 end) -- returns {[5]=3,[6]=4}
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What is truthmap trying to achieve? I can't quite figure it out, sorry.

contains by nature will always be O(N) in your implementation, so yes, it's speed is equal to the number of elements in your table.

count should probably be renamed to countOf to better signify it's intent. Better yet, you could rename it where, have it take a function, and then allow the user to use the standard # operator on the resultant table.

removePerValue seems unnecessary with a where function. Users can simply filter the table rather than remove values from the table.

equalsAll in my opinion again should take a function as an argument and not an object.

You should change your loops from for k, v in pairs(tbl) do to for _, v in pairs(tbl) do if you are not using k.

I'm sure there's things to be said about the implementation of equalsAll but I don't have time to point that out at the moment.

Do you know about the # operator? appending # to the front of a table will return a value of the size of the table (more precisely, it will return the highest indexed number in the table, so it will be incorrect for sparse arrays).

You should ideally not need comments to explain the purpose of code - your functions should describe themselves ;-)

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