4
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I'm trying to find the best - read: readable, maintainable, robust, threadsafe, usable - solution for a State Machine in python. For this I've been looking at the State Design Pattern. However I want a pythonic and lean solution (saying not implementing functions in subclasses that are not needed).

Long story short, here's what I came up with. What do you think?

#!/bin/env python
# -*- utf-8 -*-
"""Boiler Plate code for implementing a state machine according to
state design pattern

"""

class State(object):
    """Base class for a state in a statemachine

    No statemachine class is needed. State transitions have to be
    defined in self.transitions.

    The object is callable and by calling it input is handled and
    the next state is returned.

    Example usage:

    def handle(self, msg):
        self._state = self._state(msg)

    """
    transitions = [(None, None, None)]

    def __init__(self, state_context):
        self._context = state_context

    def __call__(self, inp):
        new_state = self

        state_action_list = [(state, action) for cls, state,
                     action in self.transitions if
                     isinstance(inp, cls)]
        if 1 == len(state_action_list):
            state, action = state_action_list[0]
            if action is not None:
                try:
                    action(inp)
                except TypeError:
                    action(self, inp)
            new_state = state(self._context)

        elif 1 < len(state_action_list):
            raise AmbiguousTransitionError(inp, self)

        print ("[DEBUG] %s -- %s --> %s" %
               (self.__class__.__name__,
            inp.__class__.__name__,
            new_state.__class__.__name__ ))

        return new_state

class AmbiguousTransitionError(Exception):
    """Raised if more than one state transition was found for a
    given input

    """
    pass

################################################## Example

class MsgA(object): pass
class MsgB(object): pass
class MsgC(object): pass

class StateA(State): pass

class StateB(State):
    @staticmethod
    def print_msg(inp):
        print "Inp: ", inp

class StateC(State):
    def print_context(self, unused_inp):
        print "Context: ", self._context

StateA.transitions = [(MsgA, StateB, None)]
StateB.transitions = [(MsgB, StateC, StateB.print_msg)]
StateC.transitions = [(MsgB, StateB, None),
              (MsgC, StateA, StateC.print_context)]

class Context(object):
    def __init__(self):
        self._state = StateA(self)

    def handle(self, msg):
        self._state = self._state(msg)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    CONTEXT = Context()
    CONTEXT.handle(MsgA())
    CONTEXT.handle(MsgB())
    CONTEXT.handle(MsgC())
    CONTEXT.handle(MsgB())

The output looks like this:

python State.py

[DEBUG] StateA -- MsgA --> StateB
Inp:  <__main__.MsgB object at 0x1eb6250>
[DEBUG] StateB -- MsgB --> StateC
Context:  <__main__.Context object at 0x1eb6150>
[DEBUG] StateC -- MsgC --> StateA
[DEBUG] StateA -- MsgB --> StateA
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Interesting question ! Out of curiosity, my understanding is that nothing happens when the transition is not possible. Is it something we want ? \$\endgroup\$ – SylvainD Apr 13 '14 at 16:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ Good question! I believe it depends on the field of use. For my purpose I usually need statemachines to simulate a behavior and dealing with many different messages. In this setting I don't want to repeat my code all the time. However it's easy to make the State throw an Exception if state_action_list has len 0. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Schulze Apr 13 '14 at 16:36
1
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Not a proper code review as per se but I was wondering if things couldn't be done in a more straight-forward way like this :

#!/usr/bin/python

class Machine(object):
    def __init__(self, state, transitions):
        self.transitions = transitions
        self.state = state

    def __call__(self, input):
        old_state = self.state
        self.state = self.transitions.get((self.state, input), self.state)
        print("DEBUG %s -- %s --> %s" % (old_state, input, self.state))

machine = Machine(
    "a",
    {
        ("a","msgA"):"b",
        ("b","msgB"):"c",
        ("c","msgB"):"b",
        ("c","msgC"):"a",
    }
    )

machine("msgA")
machine("msgB")
machine("msgC")
machine("msgB")

Using functions to have actual side effects, this could look like this :

#!/usr/bin/python


# examples of helper functions
def goto(s):
    return lambda state,input: s

def no_move():
    return lambda state,input: state

def verbose_no_move():
    def func(state,input):
        print('Cannot find a transition for %s from %s' % (input, state))
        return state
    return func

def print_input_and_goto(s):
    def func(state,input):
        print(input)
        return s
    return func

def print_old_state_and_goto(s):
    def func(state,input):
        print(state)
        return s
    return func

def raise_exception():
    def func(state,input):
        raise ValueError('Cannot find a transition for %s from %s' % (input, state))

class Machine(object):
    def __init__(self, initial_state, transitions):
        self.transitions = transitions
        self.state = initial_state
        self.default = verbose_no_move() # pick a default behavior

    def __call__(self, input):
        old_state = self.state
        func = self.transitions.get((self.state, input), self.default)
        self.state = func(self.state,input)
        print("DEBUG %s -- %s --> %s" % (old_state, input, self.state))


machine = Machine(
    "a",
    {
        ("a","msgA"):goto("b"),
        ("b","msgB"):print_input_and_goto("c"),
        ("c","msgB"):goto("b"),
        ("c","msgC"):print_old_state_and_goto("a"),
    }
    )

machine("msgA")
machine("msgB")
machine("msgC")
machine("msgB")
\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Thank you Josay. Unfortunately I see a couple issues with this. As this implementation is not fully object oriented it has the typical drawbacks (such as, lack of data and logic encapsulation as well as failing late - at runtime) Another major issue is that a message can not carry any payload. Furthermore due to the lack of encapsulation any change to the state machine will be a change to everything, as you're changing in the Machine scope. Again, I appreciate your feedback and believe this is a valid solution for simple scripts but not a good basis for larger size programs. \$\endgroup\$ – Martin Schulze Apr 14 '14 at 5:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ Fair enough. That's a valid explanation to me :-) \$\endgroup\$ – SylvainD Apr 14 '14 at 6:33

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