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I want to read multidimensional double array from file into a single pointer variable. The number of rows and columns are not known and need to be determined when reading the file in order to allocate memory for the array. I wrote the following code and it works fine with me. I want to know if someone has more efficient solution for such case:

//Initialize variables and open the file
size_t count=1000;
char *line = malloc(1000);
FILE *file= fopen("g.txt", "r");
if(file==NULL)
{
    printf("Error in Opening file");
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}
double *data=(double*) malloc(1000*sizeof(double));
if(data==NULL)
{
    printf("Error in allocating memory");
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

// Read number of columns and number of rows
getline(&line, &count, file);
int read=-1,cur=0,columCount=0;
while(sscanf(line+cur, "%lf%n", &data[columCount],&read)==1)
    {cur+=read;columCount=columCount+1;}

int rowCount=1;
while(getline(&line, &count, file)!=-1) {rowCount=rowCount+1;}

rewind(file);

// Reinitialize array using the number of rows and number of columns
free(data);
data=(double*) malloc(columCount*rowCount*sizeof(double));
if(data==NULL)
{
        printf("Error in allocating memory");
        return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

// Read file and store values
int i=0;
while(getline(&line, &count, file)!=-1)
{
    read=-1,cur=0;
    while(sscanf(line+cur, "%lf%n", &data[i],&read)==1)
    {cur+=read;i=i+1;}
}

fclose(file);
return EXIT_SUCCESS; 
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  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ 1. Harmonize your coding style! This especially includes the positions of braces and the number of spaces contained in one indention level (2 or 4?). 2. Do not cast the result of malloc()! \$\endgroup\$ – ComFreek Nov 29 '13 at 19:35
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You have written everything in one function (main probably) but it is better split into its components. Essentially what you want to do is:

open input file
get column count
get line count
rewind file
allocate memory for the array
read array data

Some of these stages could and probably should be in separate functions.

Taking it from the top, you open the input file, with the file name hard-coded. A better approach is to get the filename from the command line - argv[1]. You have checked for failure to open the file, which is good. The normal error handling is to use perror and the name of the failed file:

FILE *f = fopen(argv[1], "r");
if (!f) {
    perror(argv[1]);
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

You then allocate buffer data (again the error handling should use perror). You then use this buffer in a read loop to count the entries in each line, but you really don't need to save the values in the buffer at all at this stage - you discard them anyway. Your read loop could equally be:

while (sscanf(line+cur, "%*lf%n", &read) == 1) {
    cur += read;
    columCount++;
}

Notice that the format string uses a '*' to suppress assignment of the floating point value read. Note also the improved formatting and the use of ++ in columCount++. Note also that you don't check for failure in reading the first line.


Edit: Abbas pointed out that adding the '*' to suppress assignment means that we must check for 0 returned from sscanf, not 1. But sscanf also returns 0 when it fails to read anything (in this case the read count in read would also contain 0). Hence a bad character in the line will cause the loop to hang. So we must either not suppress the assignment:

double d;
while (sscanf(line+cur, "%lf%n", &d, &read) == 1) {
    cur += read;
    columCount++;
}

or we must check read.

while ((sscanf(line+cur, "%*lf%n", &read) == 0) && (read != 0)) {
    cur += read;
    columCount++;
}

I think I would go for the first. End of edit.


You then count the lines by looping through them. Note that you use a fixed size buffer line, allocated at the beginning, to read each line. To be completely flexible, you should handle lines of arbitrary length. Your lines are fixed at 1000 chars and anything beyond that breaks the code. Since you are using getline (which is non-standard, but useful) I would make use of its ability to allocate a line for you by passing a zero size.

char *line = NULL;
size_t count = 0;            // EDIT: Abbas pointed out we need to add count=0
getline(&line, &count, file);
// use the line
free(line);

In this, line is just a pointer. getline allocates a buffer large enough to hold the line of text and places a pointer to the buffer in line. You must free that line later.

So now you have the column and row count. Those two stages (reading the two sizes) would be better extracted into a separate function.

You now rewind the file and allocate the real array. As stated above, this should be the first allocation of the program. Following this you read the data into the array. This might be better split into a separate function. The read loop can be simpler than yours - you don't need to get a line and then scan it - just scan it directly:

int ndata = 0;
while (scanf("%lg", &data[ndata++]) == 1) {
    // nothing
}
ndata -= columCount * rowCount;
if (ndata != 0) {
    printf("%s data values in input\n", ndata > 0 ? "Too few" : "Too many");
    return EXIT_FAILURE;
}

And remember to check that the number of doubles read matches what you were expecting.

Note that scanf and its associates do not react well to malformed input. There are other ways of reading text but in the simple case (of properly formed data) they are more complicated. Someone else might give you some examples/alternatives.

Finally note that your formatting is inconsistent, as if bits have been cut and pasted from elsewhere. Copying code from your previous work is not necessarily bad, but make sure you make the whole thing looks as if it belongs together.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for the excellent and comprehensive answer. However, when I applied your code hints, I found some bugs, and I corrected them as follows: First) getline requires that the first two parameters to be assigned to null and 0, respectively, before calling the function. So, getline(&line, 0, file) gave me an error, however, char *line=NULL; int count=0; getline(&line, &count, file); works. Second) The value 1 should be replaced by 0 in while (sscanf(line+cur, "%*lf%n", &read) == 1). Third) The value 0 should be replaced by 1 in if (ndata != 0). Is what I did correct? \$\endgroup\$ – Abbas Nov 30 '13 at 11:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oops! Your first point is correct. Your second is correct but throws up the problem that a bad character in the input will cause and endless loop. I'll edit my answer to comment on this. The third, I can't see why ndata should be 1 at the end of the loop. \$\endgroup\$ – William Morris Nov 30 '13 at 17:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks @William Morris. Regarding the third point: it is because you put data[ndata++] in the while condition, so, if the array has 20 elements, after executing the while loop ndata will have the value 22 (This is because the ++ executed even if the while condition result is false). One final note: in the while loop, you put it scanf, but, it should be fscanf(f,"%lg",....) \$\endgroup\$ – Abbas Nov 30 '13 at 17:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ah yes, you are right. The perils of using a while loop when a for would have been more appropriate :-) \$\endgroup\$ – William Morris Nov 30 '13 at 19:01

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