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Previous: Advent of Code 2020 - Day 2: validating passwords

Problem statement

I decided to take a shot at Advent of Code 2020 to exercise my Rust knowledge. Here's the task for Day 3:

Day 3: Password Philosophy

[...]

Due to the local geology, trees in this area only grow on exact integer coordinates in a grid. You make a map (your puzzle input) of the open squares (.) and trees (#) you can see. For example:

..##.......
#...#...#..
.#....#..#.
..#.#...#.#
.#...##..#.
..#.##.....
.#.#.#....#
.#........#
#.##...#...
#...##....#
.#..#...#.#

These aren't the only trees, though; due to something you read about once involving arboreal genetics and biome stability, the same pattern repeats to the right many times:

..##.........##.........##.........##.........##.........##....... --->
#...#...#..#...#...#..#...#...#..#...#...#..#...#...#..#...#...#..
.#....#..#..#....#..#..#....#..#..#....#..#..#....#..#..#....#..#.
..#.#...#.#..#.#...#.#..#.#...#.#..#.#...#.#..#.#...#.#..#.#...#.#
.#...##..#..#...##..#..#...##..#..#...##..#..#...##..#..#...##..#.
..#.##.......#.##.......#.##.......#.##.......#.##.......#.##..... --->
.#.#.#....#.#.#.#....#.#.#.#....#.#.#.#....#.#.#.#....#.#.#.#....#
.#........#.#........#.#........#.#........#.#........#.#........#
#.##...#...#.##...#...#.##...#...#.##...#...#.##...#...#.##...#...
#...##....##...##....##...##....##...##....##...##....##...##....#
.#..#...#.#.#..#...#.#.#..#...#.#.#..#...#.#.#..#...#.#.#..#...#.# --->

You start on the open square (.) in the top-left corner and need to reach the bottom (below the bottom-most row on your map).

The toboggan can only follow a few specific slopes (you opted for a cheaper model that prefers rational numbers); start by counting all the trees you would encounter for the slope right 3, down 1:

From your starting position at the top-left, check the position that is right 3 and down 1. Then, check the position that is right 3 and down 1 from there, and so on until you go past the bottom of the map.

The locations you'd check in the above example are marked here with O where there was an open square and X where there was a tree:

..##.........##.........##.........##.........##.........##....... --->
#..O#...#..#...#...#..#...#...#..#...#...#..#...#...#..#...#...#..
.#....X..#..#....#..#..#....#..#..#....#..#..#....#..#..#....#..#.
..#.#...#O#..#.#...#.#..#.#...#.#..#.#...#.#..#.#...#.#..#.#...#.#
.#...##..#..X...##..#..#...##..#..#...##..#..#...##..#..#...##..#.
..#.##.......#.X#.......#.##.......#.##.......#.##.......#.##..... --->
.#.#.#....#.#.#.#.O..#.#.#.#....#.#.#.#....#.#.#.#....#.#.#.#....#
.#........#.#........X.#........#.#........#.#........#.#........#
#.##...#...#.##...#...#.X#...#...#.##...#...#.##...#...#.##...#...
#...##....##...##....##...#X....##...##....##...##....##...##....#
.#..#...#.#.#..#...#.#.#..#...X.#.#..#...#.#.#..#...#.#.#..#...#.# --->

In this example, traversing the map using this slope would cause you to encounter 7 trees.

Starting at the top-left corner of your map and following a slope of right 3 and down 1, how many trees would you encounter?

[...]

Part Two

Time to check the rest of the slopes - you need to minimize the probability of a sudden arboreal stop, after all.

Determine the number of trees you would encounter if, for each of the following slopes, you start at the top-left corner and traverse the map all the way to the bottom:

  • Right 1, down 1.
  • Right 3, down 1. (This is the slope you already checked.)
  • Right 5, down 1.
  • Right 7, down 1.
  • Right 1, down 2.

In the above example, these slopes would find 2, 7, 3, 4, and 2 tree(s) respectively; multiplied together, these produce the answer 336.

What do you get if you multiply together the number of trees encountered on each of the listed slopes?

The full story can be found on the website.

My solution

src/day_3.rs

use {
    anyhow::{anyhow, bail, ensure, Result},
    itertools::Itertools,
    ndarray::prelude::*,
    std::io::{self, prelude::*},
};

pub const PATH: &str = "./data/day_3/input";

#[derive(Clone, Copy, Debug, Eq, Hash, PartialEq)]
pub enum Pixel {
    Empty,
    Tree,
}

impl Pixel {
    pub fn from_char(c: char) -> Result<Self> {
        match c {
            '.' => Ok(Self::Empty),
            '#' => Ok(Self::Tree),
            _ => bail!("invalid pixel"),
        }
    }
}

#[derive(Clone, Debug, Eq, Hash, PartialEq)]
pub struct Terrain {
    pixels: Array2<Pixel>,
}

impl Terrain {
    pub fn parse_from<R: BufRead>(reader: R) -> Result<Self> {
        TerrainParser::parse(reader.lines())
    }

    pub fn slope_count(&self, delta_x: usize, delta_y: usize) -> usize {
        assert!(delta_y != 0, "delta_y is zero");

        let pixels = &self.pixels;

        (0..pixels.nrows())
            .step_by(delta_y)
            .zip((0..).step_by(delta_x).map(|x| x % pixels.ncols()))
            .filter(|pos| pixels[*pos] == Pixel::Tree)
            .count()
    }
}

#[derive(Debug)]
struct TerrainParser {
    pixels: Vec<Pixel>,
    width: usize,
    height: usize,
}

impl TerrainParser {
    fn parse<R: BufRead>(mut lines: io::Lines<R>) -> Result<Terrain> {
        let first_line =
            lines.next().ok_or_else(|| anyhow!("empty terrain"))??;
        let mut parser = Self::parse_first_line(&first_line)?;

        for line in lines {
            parser = parser.parse_line(&line?)?;
        }

        let TerrainParser {
            pixels,
            width,
            height,
        } = parser;

        Ok(Terrain {
            pixels: Array2::from_shape_vec([height, width], pixels)?,
        })
    }

    fn parse_first_line(line: &str) -> Result<Self> {
        let pixels: Vec<_> =
            line.chars().map(Pixel::from_char).try_collect()?;

        let width = pixels.len();
        ensure!(width != 0, "zero-width terrain");

        Ok(Self {
            pixels,
            width,
            height: 1,
        })
    }

    fn parse_line(mut self, line: &str) -> Result<Self> {
        let expected_len = self.pixels.len() + self.width;
        self.pixels.reserve_exact(self.width);

        itertools::process_results(
            line.chars().map(Pixel::from_char),
            |pixels| self.pixels.extend(pixels),
        )?;
        ensure!(self.pixels.len() == expected_len, "jagged terrain");

        self.height += 1;
        Ok(self)
    }
}

#[cfg(test)]
mod tests {
    use {super::*, std::io::BufReader};

    #[test]
    fn pixel_from_char() {
        assert_eq!(Pixel::from_char('.').unwrap(), Pixel::Empty);
        assert_eq!(Pixel::from_char('#').unwrap(), Pixel::Tree);
        assert!(Pixel::from_char(' ').is_err());
    }

    #[test]
    fn terrain_parse_from() -> anyhow::Result<()> {
        fn parse(input: &str) -> Result<Terrain> {
            Terrain::parse_from(BufReader::new(input.as_bytes()))
        }

        let expected = Array2::from_shape_vec(
            [3, 3],
            [Pixel::Empty, Pixel::Tree]
                .iter()
                .copied()
                .cycle()
                .take(9)
                .collect(),
        )?;
        assert_eq!(parse(".#.\n#.#\n.#.\n")?.pixels, expected);

        assert!(parse("").is_err());
        assert!(parse(". #").is_err());
        assert!(parse(".\n##").is_err());

        Ok(())
    }

    #[test]
    fn terrain_slope_count() -> anyhow::Result<()> {
        // .#.
        // #.#
        // .#.
        // #.#
        let pixels = Array2::from_shape_vec(
            [4, 3],
            [Pixel::Empty, Pixel::Tree]
                .iter()
                .copied()
                .cycle()
                .take(12)
                .collect(),
        )?;
        let terrain = Terrain { pixels };

        assert_eq!(terrain.slope_count(1, 1), 1);
        assert_eq!(terrain.slope_count(2, 1), 3);
        assert_eq!(terrain.slope_count(3, 1), 2);
        assert_eq!(terrain.slope_count(1, 2), 1);

        Ok(())
    }
}

src/bin/day_3_1.rs

use {
    anyhow::Result,
    aoc_2020::day_3::{self as lib, Terrain},
    std::{fs::File, io::BufReader},
};

fn main() -> Result<()> {
    let file = BufReader::new(File::open(lib::PATH)?);

    let count = Terrain::parse_from(file)?.slope_count(3, 1);
    println!("{}", count);

    Ok(())
}

src/bin/day_3_2.rs

use {
    anyhow::Result,
    aoc_2020::day_3::{self as lib, Terrain},
    std::{fs::File, io::BufReader},
};

const SLOPES: &[[usize; 2]] = &[[1, 1], [3, 1], [5, 1], [7, 1], [1, 2]];

fn main() -> Result<()> {
    let file = BufReader::new(File::open(lib::PATH)?);
    let terrain = Terrain::parse_from(file)?;

    let product: usize = SLOPES
        .iter()
        .map(|&[delta_x, delta_y]| terrain.slope_count(delta_x, delta_y))
        .product();
    println!("{}", product);

    Ok(())
}

Crates used: anyhow 1.0.37 itertools 0.10.0 ndarray 0.14.0

cargo fmt and cargo clippy have been applied.

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Main files & solution layout

Seems OK. I always order my imports from the most standard to the most specific, so your order is (anyhow, aoc_2020, std) while mine would be (std, anyhow, aoc_2020).

lib::TerrainParser && lib::Terrain

In future Rust versions, you may do .flatten()? instead of the weird-looking ??. We aren't at that stable point yet.

I would consider implementing TryFrom<TerrainParser> for Terrain for use in TerrainParser::parse. There's an argument against that -- exposing such a method is not needed.

fn slope_count

I "refactored" the main iteration logic as follows

let pos_x = (0..pixels.ncols()).cycle().step_by(delta_x);
let pos_y = (0..pixels.nrows()).step_by(delta_y);
pos_y.zip(pos_x)
    .filter(|pos| pixels[*pos] == Pixel::Tree)
    .count()

Testing

Doing the pixel_from_char test seems entirely unnecessary. It reflects code 1:1. This is write-once code, but such tests would be a pain in write-often code contexts. Furthermore, you are already running this functionality from other tests. I'd focus on these other tests.

I would change assert_eq!(parse(".#.\n#.#\n.#.\n")?.pixels, expected); to

assert_eq!(
    parse(concat!(
        ".#.\n",
        "#.#\n",
        ".#.\n"
    ))?.pixels,
    expected
);
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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Helpful review as always. The import order was chosen by rustfmt — this can be overrided with a separate use std::{ /* ... */ } though. The fact that the index order is (Y, X) rather than (X, Y) also trips me a lot :( As for testing, I don't think I've been paying enough attention to them, so I'll try to write concise and useful tests in the future. Thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – L. F. Feb 11 at 1:32

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