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I am developing a web-application and I am encountering some trouble : I have some tabs and each one contains input forms with different values. I need to switch beetween these tabs and see the different contents of each one. So I thought I could create objects for every tab , but I have to name them , I use something like this :

Object

var step = function(params){
this.id = randID();
this.titolo = null;
this.descrizione = null;
this.dmax = null;
$.extend(this,params);   
// this.render();
}

When the button is clicked , it instance a new object

$("#btn").on('click',function(){
stepA = new step({
"titolo" : $("#titolo").val(),
"descrizione" : $("#descrizione").val()
})
var id = stepA.id;
var nome = "step"+id;
console.log(nome);
nome = stepA;
console.log(nome);
});

As you can see , I used this solution to name every step object with his ID

var id = stepA.id;
var nome = "step"+id;
console.log(nome);
nome = stepA;
console.log(nome);

otherwise I think is a really bad solution. Notice that I will call every object by his id clicking on the tabs.

Hope you can help me improve it, thank you guys.

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Mar 17 '13 at 11:41

This question came from our site for professional and enthusiast programmers.

  • \$\begingroup\$ If you are using jQuery and jQueryUI why don't you use the tab control in that library: api.jqueryui.com/tabs \$\endgroup\$ – Hogan Mar 17 '13 at 11:48
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I would use some MV* library for this kind of task. Maybe you have a look at Backbone. A small library (about 7k in production) with lots of nice functionality for those kinds of tasks.

1) You have models representing you data as a proper javascript object. Each model is instantiated with:

var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({});
var instance = new MyModel();

You could use defaults:

var MyModel = Backbone.Model.extend({ 
    defaults: { name: 'Freddy Krueger', age: 0, child: '' }
}); 

Models have events to which you could subscribe. Most used is the "change" event. So you could bind a function to a general change by just declaring

model.on("change", function(){});

Or if you want to watch a specific attribute to change

model.on("change:name", function(){});

Of course you could "trigger" custom events

model.trigger("outOfOrder");

2) You could use views to render the different forms

View = Backbone.View.extend({
    el: $("#placeToRender"),
    render:function(){
        $(this.el).html(yourMagicHTML);
    }
});

Even better: you have microtemplating on board, which means: You could define HTML including placeholders within a script-tag

<script type="text/template" id="#maintemplate">
    <div>
       <%= content %>
    </div>
</script>

That wouldn't be rendered by your browser, but you could get its content by

$("#maintemplate").html()

So that your view could render itself easily with:

View = Backbone.View.extend({
    el: $("#main"),
    template:_template($("#maintemplate").html()),
    render:function(){
        $(this.el).html(template(this.model.toJSON()));
    }
});

Where

this.model.toJSON()

is in fact a model with a key called "content" (e.g. {content:"blah!"}), which is used to render the template,

so that <%= content %> is substituted with the actual content. And many more stuff to discover.

Referring to your problem - you could abstract your problem with backbone like the following: Every tab you need to display is a view to which belongs a template to determine its html as well as a model, which represents the content of the tab. You could embed each tab in another view, such that you have one embracing view to control the whole tabbing system and nesting views, which represent each individual tab.

You could write a custom show() method to show an individual tab and a method which coordinates which of the tabs is shown and which should be hidden.

So instead of doing the annoying work yourself, it may be a good idea to use a library to help.

Some places to start (besides the official API and documentation):

http://backbonetutorials.com/

http://ricostacruz.com/backbone-patterns/

http://coenraets.org/blog/2011/12/backbone-js-wine-cellar-tutorial-part-1-getting-started/

http://addyosmani.github.io/backbone-fundamentals/

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var step = function(params){
    this.id = randID();
    this.titolo = params.titolo;
    this.descrizione = params.descrizione;
    this.dmax = null;
}

$("#btn").on('click',function(){
    stepA = new step({
        "titolo" : $("#titolo").val(),
        "descrizione" : $("#descrizione").val()
    })
    var id = stepA.id;
    var nome = "step"+id;
    console.log(nome);
    console.log(stepA);
});

You don't need to use extend in the constructor. And I don't understand the nome = stepA line too.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ ` nome = stepA ` is needed to give a different name every time I create a object , because ` nome = "step"+id ` so ` nome = step24904 ` \$\endgroup\$ – steo Mar 1 '13 at 10:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ But you give nome value twice, that's what I don't understand. \$\endgroup\$ – Sylvanus Mar 1 '13 at 10:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think it could be solved using an array \$\endgroup\$ – steo Mar 1 '13 at 10:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you want more help, please provide more info. \$\endgroup\$ – Sylvanus Mar 1 '13 at 11:22

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