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I'm working with a small bash code which is working fine but i'm just looking if there is better way to formulate this, In this code i'm looking for the Files between year 2002 and 2018 on the 7th column.

Below is the working code,

Script:

#!/bin/bash
# scriptName: Ftpcal.sh
FILE="/home/pygo/Cyberark/ftplogs_3"
AWK="/bin/awk"
GREP="/bin/grep"
USERS="`"$AWK" '$7 >= "2002" && $7 <= "2018"' $FILE | "$AWK" '{print $3}' | sort -u`"
for user in $USERS;
do
echo "User $user " | tr -d "\n";
"$AWK" '$7 >= "2002" && $7 <= "2018"' "$FILE" | "$GREP" "$user" | "$AWK" '{ total += $4}; END { print "Total Space consumed: "  total/1024/1024/1024 "GB"}';
done | column -t
echo ""
echo "=============================================================="
"$AWK" '$7 >= "2002" && $7 <= "2018"' "$FILE" | "$AWK" '{ total += $4}; END { print "Total Space consumed by All Users: "  total/1024/1024/1024 "GB"}';
echo ""

Actual data Result:

$ sh Ftpcal.sh

User  16871                   Total  Space  consumed:  0.0905161GB
User  253758                  Total  Space  consumed:  0.0750855GB
User  34130                   Total  Space  consumed:  3.52537GB
User  36640                   Total  Space  consumed:  0.55393GB
User  8490                    Total  Space  consumed:  3.70858GB
User  tx-am                   Total  Space  consumed:  0.18992GB
User  tx-ffv                  Total  Space  consumed:  0.183137GB
User  tx-ttv                  Total  Space  consumed:  17.2371GB
User  tx-st                   Total  Space  consumed:  0.201205GB
User  tx-ti                   Total  Space  consumed:  58.9704GB
User  tx-tts                 Total  Space  consumed:  0.0762068GB

------------ snipped output --------------
==============================================================
Total Space consumed by All Users: 255.368GB

Sample data:

-rw-r--r-- 1 34130 14063436 Aug 15  2002 /current/focus-del/files/from_fix.v.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 34130 14060876 Jul 12  2007 /current/focus-del/files/from1_fix.v.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 34130 58668461 Feb 23  2006 /current/focus-del/files/from_1.tar.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 34130 14069343 Aug  7  20017 /current/focus-del/files/from_tm_fix.v.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 34130 38179000 Dec  7  20016 /current/focus-del/files/from_tm.gds.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 34130 15157902 Nov 22  20015 /current/focus-del/files/from_for.tar.gz
-rw-r--r-- 1 34130 97986560 Nov  4  20015 /current/focus-del/files/from_layout.tar

Sample Result:

$ sh Ftp_cal.sh
User  34130  Total  Space  consumed:  0.0808321GB

==============================================================
Total Space consumed by All Users: 0.0808321GB

I'm okay with any better approach as a review process to make it more robust.

Thanks.

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AWK="/bin/awk"

It's easier and more readable if you just set your PATH to something appropriate.

USERS="`"$AWK" '$7 >= "2002" && $7 <= "2018"' $FILE | "$AWK" '{print $3}' | sort -u`"

Backticks should almost always be replaced by $( … ), which is faster because it does not invoke a subshell.

Literal numbers should not be quoted. It happens to still do what you want in awk; in some languages it won't. A bad habit, easily avoided.

There's no need to invoke awk a second time to extract the third field. Simply pair the action {print $3} with the condition ($7 >= …) that's already there.

It's good form to indent the body of a for block (or any other block).

echo "User $user " | tr -d "\n";

To suppress a newline on echo, use echo -n.

column -t

This has some awkward consequences, like tabs inside of labels ("TotalTABSpace") and unaligned numbers. printf will give much prettier results. Both bash and awk provide it.

total/1024/1024/1024 

Nothing wrong with this, as such, but 2**30 is useful shorthand for gigabyte.

==============================================================

Bash can generate sequences like this with the idiom printf "=%.0s" {1..62}. The = is the character and 62 is the count.

You're traversing the file three times and extracting the same information each time. This is going to get slow as the file grows. Awk has associative arrays: you can store a subtotal for each user, then iterate and print those subtotals at the end of the awk script, accomplishing the whole thing in one go.

Putting it all together:

/bin/awk -vusrfmt="User %-20s Total Space consumed: %11.6f GB\n" \
         -vsumfmt=$( printf "=%.0s" {1..62} )"\nTotal Space consumed by All Users: %.6f GB\n"  '
  $7 >= 2002 && $7 <= 2018 { 
    subtot[$3]+=$4
    tot+=$4
  }
  END {
    for (u in subtot) printf usrfmt, u, subtot[u] / 2**30
    printf sumfmt, tot / 2**30
  }'
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  • \$\begingroup\$ "Backticks should almost always be replaced by $( … )". Why just "almost always" and not "always" ? \$\endgroup\$ – janos Apr 20 at 21:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think backticks can improve readability versus nested $( $ ( ) ); consider something like x=$( printf %d $( wc -l $file ) ); replacing the inner parens with backticks is okay there. \$\endgroup\$ – Oh My Goodness Apr 21 at 0:44

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