15
\$\begingroup\$

This script is a tool to help minecraft mod development. When you want to add a new block to the game you have to create three json files. This script generates three JSON files in specific locations. It's intended to be run in a certain directory so that the files go into the right location. Also it's for my own personal use.

The reason I didn't use the json module is simply because I didn't feel like. If it would make this script much better then I am all for switching to that although I did enjoy writing my json methods and found it educational which is another reason I'm making this, to learn a bit of python.

It's quite long and I think the functions could be taken out into a new file but then I'll need to make sure I have both files just to run this which I don't like.

I'm not concerned about efficiency or speed, just readability and maintainability, and general best practice.

import os

# Declare Functions
def jsonStart():
    return "{\n"

def jsonEnd(indent):    
    return "\n" + jsonIndent(indent) + "}"

def jsonIndent(amount):
    amount = amount * 4
    return " " * amount

def jsonKeyValue(key, value, indent = 0):
    return jsonIndent(indent) + jsonKey(key) + jsonValue(value)

def jsonKey(key, indent = 0):
    return jsonIndent(indent) + "\"" + key + "\"" + ": "

def jsonValue(value):
    return "\"" + value + "\""

def deleteCreatedFiles():
    print("\nSomething went wrong")
    for file in createdFiles:
        print("Deleting: " + file)
        os.remove(file)
    print("\n")

def createFile(filename, data):
    try:
        os.makedirs(os.path.dirname(filename), exist_ok=True)
        with open(filename, "w+")as newFile:
            newFile.write(data)
    except:
        deleteCreatedFiles()
        raise
    else:
        createdFiles.append(os.path.relpath(newFile.name))
        print("Created" + os.path.relpath(newFile.name))

def blockStatesFile():
    data = jsonStart()
    data += jsonKey("variants", 1) + jsonStart()
    data += jsonKey("normal", 2) + "{ " + jsonKeyValue("model", modid + ":" + blockName) + "}"
    data += jsonEnd(1)
    data += jsonEnd(0)
    return data

def modelsItemFile():
    data = jsonStart()
    data += jsonKeyValue("parent", modid + ":block/" + blockName, 1) + ",\n"
    data += jsonKey("textures", 1) + jsonStart()
    data += jsonKeyValue("layer0", modid + ":items/" + blockName, 2)
    data += jsonEnd(1)
    data += jsonEnd(0)
    return data

def modelsBlockFile():
    data = jsonStart()
    data += jsonKeyValue("parent", "block/cube_all", 1) + ",\n"
    data += jsonKey("textures", 1) + jsonStart()
    data += jsonKeyValue("all", modid + ":blocks/" + blockName, 2)
    data += jsonEnd(1)
    data += jsonEnd(0)
    return data

# Run Script
createdFiles = []
blockName = input("block name: ")
modid = input("modid: ")
createFile("blockstates/" + blockName + ".json", blockStatesFile())
createFile("models/item/" + blockName + ".json", modelsItemFile())
createFile("models/block/" + blockName + ".json", modelsBlockFile())
\$\endgroup\$
13
\$\begingroup\$

I won't repeat @victor's answer, but Python is a language that comes with batteries included; meaning that a lot of behaviour has already been bundled into modules, and is maintained for correctness and performance. You should really avoid to reinvent the wheel if it is not for learning purposes.

Python also comes with an official style guide: PEP8, which is advised to follow if you want your code to look like Python code to others.

Your code also rely heavily on variables defined globally. This kind of code is error prone and less reusable. Instead, define arguments for your functions and pass information as parameters.

Lastly, you should avoid keeping code at the top-level of the file, protect it with an if __name__ == '__main__' guard:

import os
import json


def delete_files(files):
    for filename in files:
        os.remove(filename)


def create_file(filename, data, created_files):
    try:
        os.makedirs(os.path.dirname(filename), exist_ok=True)
        with open(filename, "w+") as new_file:
            json.dump(data, new_file, indent=4)
    except:
        print("\nSomething went wrong")
        print("Deleting:", *created_files)
        print("\n")
        delete_files(created_files)
        raise
    else:
        filepath = os.path.relpath(new_file.name)
        created_files.append(filepath)
        print("Created", filepath)


def block_states(modid, block_name):
    return {
        'variants': {
            'normal': {
                'model': f'{modid}:{block_name}',
            },
        },
    }


def models_item(modid, block_name):
    return {
        'parent': f'{modid}:block/{block_name}',
        'textures': {
            'layer0': f'{modid}:items/{block_name}',
        },
    }


def models_block(modid, block_name):
    return {
        'parent': 'block/cube_all',
        'textures': {
            'all': f'{modid}:blocks/{block_name}',
        },
    }


def main(modid, block_name):    
    created_files = []
    create_file(
            f'blockstates/{block_name}.json',
            block_states(modid, block_name),
            created_files)
    create_file(
            f'models/item/{block_name}.json',
            models_item(modid, block_name),
            created_files)
    create_file(
            f'models/block/{block_name}.json',
            models_block(modid, block_name),
            created_files)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    block_name = input("block name: ")
    modid = input("modid: ")
    main(modid, block_name)
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Changed this to the accepted answer as it covers more than just using the json library and has shown me the best practice for using if name == 'main': and the official style guide updates \$\endgroup\$ – Dalton Dec 27 '18 at 13:50
10
\$\begingroup\$

If all you need is just readability and maintainability, and general best practice, don't reinvent the wheel. You have the json library and it would be a sin not to use it. Firstly, you are greatly complicated the readability and extensibility. Secondly, JSON is not so simple (at least, you need to escape some special characters).

I rewrote your code and you have the opportunity to compare them:

import os, json

# Declare Functions
def deleteCreatedFiles():
    print("\nSomething went wrong")
    for file in createdFiles:
        print("Deleting: " + file)
        os.remove(file)
    print("\n")

def createFile(filename, data):
    try:
        os.makedirs(os.path.dirname(filename), exist_ok=True)
        with open(filename, "w+") as newFile:
            jstr = json.dumps(data, indent=4)
            newFile.write(jstr)
    except:
        deleteCreatedFiles()
        raise
    else:
        createdFiles.append(os.path.relpath(newFile.name))
        print("Created" + os.path.relpath(newFile.name))

def blockStatesFile():
    return {
        'variants': {
            'normal': {
                'model': modid + ":" + blockName
            }
        }
    }

def modelsItemFile():
    return {
        'parent': modid + ":block/" + blockName,
        'textures': {
            'layer0': modid + ":items/" + blockName
        }
    }

def modelsBlockFile():
    return {
        'parent': 'block/cube_all',
        'textures': {
            'all': modid + ":blocks/" + blockName
        }
    }

# Run Script
createdFiles = []
blockName = input("block name: ")
modid = input("modid: ")
createFile("blockstates/" + blockName + ".json", blockStatesFile())
createFile("models/item/" + blockName + ".json", modelsItemFile())
createFile("models/block/" + blockName + ".json", modelsBlockFile())
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ This is so much better! I'm surprised to see the functions that return the JSON actually work like that, that is really nice! \$\endgroup\$ – Dalton Dec 27 '18 at 12:01
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ With Python 3.6 and f-strings: f"{modid}:{blockName}", f"blockstates/{blockName}.json", ... are a bit shorter and more readable IMO. \$\endgroup\$ – Graipher Dec 27 '18 at 12:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Graipher I wondered if this sort of syntax was available in Python I am now using it in my script! \$\endgroup\$ – Dalton Dec 27 '18 at 12:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.