6
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Following up on my implementation of Cryptopals Challenge 1, this is my solution to Challenge 3.

Single-byte XOR cipher The hex encoded string:

1b37373331363f78151b7f2b783431333d78397828372d363c78373e783a393b3736

... has been XOR'd against a single character. Find the key, decrypt the message.

You can do this by hand. But don't: write code to do it for you.

How? Devise some method for "scoring" a piece of English plaintext. Character frequency is a good metric. Evaluate each output and choose the one with the best score.

The idea here is that I try to decrypt with every possible single byte repeating key (each extended ascii/utf8 character), then compare the resulting character frequency to the expected frequency with a Chi-Squared test.

$$ \chi^2 = \sum_{i=1}^n \frac{(obs - exp)^2}{exp} $$

If \$\chi^2\$ < the critical value, then the decrypted cipher is determined to be English text, therefore we've cracked the cipher and found the key.

I'm some data and a build script to do some code generation before compiling the rest of the project.

data/english.csv

32,17.1660
101,8.5771
116,6.3700
111,5.7701
97,5.1880
...

build.rs

use std::env;
use std::fs::File;
use std::io::BufRead;
use std::io::BufReader;
use std::io::Write;
use std::path::Path;

fn main() {
    let declaration = String::from("fn english_frequencies() -> HashMap<u8, f32> {[");

    // csv must be 2 columns, no header
    // ascii number, frequency as percentage
    // 32,17.16660
    let file = File::open("data/english.csv").unwrap();
    let reader = BufReader::new(&file);

    let formatted_lines = reader
        .lines()
        .map(|line| format!("({}),\n", line.unwrap()))
        .collect();

    let close = String::from("].iter().cloned().collect()}");

    let out_dir = env::var("OUT_DIR").unwrap();
    let dest_path = Path::new(&out_dir).join("english_frequencies.rs");
    let mut f = File::create(&dest_path).unwrap();

    f.write_all(
        &[declaration, formatted_lines, close]
            .join("\n")
            .into_bytes(),
    ).unwrap();
}

This generated table of expected frequencies is then included in a module that implements the frequency analysis.

src/frequency.rs

use std::collections::HashMap;

include!(concat!(env!("OUT_DIR"), "/english_frequencies.rs"));

pub fn english(message: &str) -> bool {
    let expected_counts: HashMap<char, f32> = english_frequencies()
        .iter()
        .map(|(k, freq)| (k.clone() as char, (freq / 100.0) * (message.len() as f32)))
        .collect();

    let actual_counts = message
        .chars()
        .fold(HashMap::new(), |mut acc: HashMap<char, isize>, c| {
            let count = match acc.get(&c) {
                Some(x) => x.clone() + 1,
                None => 1,
            };

            acc.insert(c, count);
            acc
        });

    let chi_statistic = chi_statistic(actual_counts, expected_counts);
    if cfg!(debug_assertions) {
        println!("X-statistic: {}", chi_statistic);
    }

    //  Degrees of freedom = 256 - 1 = 255 (character space)
    //  Usign this table:
    //  https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Engineering_Tables/Chi-Squared_Distibution
    //  We can use the approximate value for 250 degrees of fredom.
    //  Given a significance factor (alpha) of 0.05, our critical value is 287.882.
    //  If our chi_statistic is < the critical_value, then we have a match.
    //  See this page for an explanation:
    //  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chi-squared_distribution#Table_of_%CF%872_values_vs_p-values
    chi_statistic < 287.882
}

/// Calculates Pearson's Cumulative Chi Statistic
/// https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pearson%27s_chi-squared_test#Calculating_the_test-statistic
///
/// This is a slight variation.
/// Technichally, if the expected value is zero and the actual is non-zero, then the statistic is infinite.
/// For the sake of ergonommics, this implementation assumes missing expected values to be small, but non-zero.
/// This allows us to only specify values in the expected frequencies that are statistically
/// significant while allowing for all valid utf-8 characters in the message.
fn chi_statistic(observed: HashMap<char, isize>, expected: HashMap<char, f32>) -> f32 {
    observed
        .into_iter()
        .map(|(key, obs)| {
            let exp = match expected.get(&key) {
                Some(x) => x.clone() as f32,
                None => 0.0000001, //non-zero, but tiny possibility
            };

            (obs as f32 - exp).powi(2) / exp
        }).sum()
}

#[cfg(test)]
mod tests {
    use super::*;

    #[test]
    fn bacon_message_is_english() {
        let message = "Cooking MC's like a pound of bacon";
        assert!(english(message));
    }

    #[test]
    fn message_with_unprintable_chars_is_not_english() {
        assert!(!english(
            "\u{7f}SSWUR[\u{1c}q\u{7f}\u{1b}O\u{1c}PUWY\u{1c}]\u{1c}LSIRX\u{1c}SZ\u{1c}^]_SR"
        ));
    }

    #[test]
    fn printable_nonsense_is_not_english() {
        assert!(!english("Yuuqst}:WY=i:vsq\u{7f}:{:juot~:u|:x{yut"));
    }

    #[test]
    fn readable_but_incorrect_is_not_english() {
        assert!(!english(
            "cOOKING\u{0}mc\u{7}S\u{0}LIKE\u{0}A\u{0}POUND\u{0}OF\u{0}BACON"
        ));
    }
}

Finally, we call it from the main program and crack the cipher.

src/main.rs

extern crate cryptopals;
use cryptopals::byte_array::xor;
use cryptopals::frequency;
use cryptopals::hex;

use std::iter;

fn main() {
    let secret =
        hex::to_bytes("1b37373331363f78151b7f2b783431333d78397828372d363c78373e783a393b3736");

    println!("{:?}", crack_xor(&secret));
}

fn crack_xor(cipher: &[u8]) -> Vec<String> {
    let alphabet = 0..255u8; /* ascii/utf-8 range */

    alphabet
        .into_iter()
        .filter_map(|c| {
            let key = iter::repeat(c).take(cipher.len()).collect::<Vec<u8>>();
            let decrypted = xor(&cipher, &key);

            match String::from_utf8(decrypted) {
                Ok(s) => Some(s),
                Err(_) => None,
            }
        }).filter(|s| frequency::english(s))
        .collect::<Vec<String>>()
}

#[cfg(test)]
mod tests {
    use super::*;

    #[test]
    fn analysis_matches_bacon_message() {
        let secret =
            hex::to_bytes("1b37373331363f78151b7f2b783431333d78397828372d363c78373e783a393b3736");

        let actual = crack_xor(&secret);

        assert_eq!(vec!["Cooking MC's like a pound of bacon"], actual);
    }
}
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1
+100
\$\begingroup\$

Why use a build.rs here? Why not read english.csv in at runtime? For the purposes of an exercise like that I'm surprised you went to the trouble of converting the csv file into rust code like that.

If you wanted to move as much work as possible to compile time you only went part way. You still have to postprocess the returned HashMap by converting the u8 to chars and converting the 0-100 range to 0-1. Why not do that additional conversion work up front.

include!(concat!(env!("OUT_DIR"), "/english_frequencies.rs"));

Given that it is rust code, I wonder if you could instead use:

mod english_frequencies;

Thus including the rust code as a module instead of inserting the code literally here. (I'm not sure I've not tried it).

        .map(|(k, freq)| (k.clone() as char, (freq / 100.0) * (message.len() as f32)))

You clone char/u8 a a lot, but you don't need to. They are copy types and will be "cloned" automatically in most contexts.

            let count = match acc.get(&c) {
                Some(x) => x.clone() + 1,
                None => 1,
            };

            acc.insert(c, count);

This whole bit can be replaced by:

*acc.entry(c).or_insert(0) += 1;

Moving on...

fn chi_statistic(observed: HashMap<char, isize>, expected: HashMap<char, f32>) -> f32 {

It is a bit weird that this function takes ownership of the HashMaps. You don't need to consume the hashmaps in the function, so I'd expect borrows.

        let exp = match expected.get(&key) {
            Some(x) => x.clone() as f32,
            None => 0.0000001, //non-zero, but tiny possibility
        };

You can write this as:

 let exp = expected.get(&key).map(|x| x as f32).unwrap_or(0.0000001);

I'm not sure whether that's better or not, but it is an option.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The build.rs is an artifact of having originally having a huge map defined in the code and simply being curious about code gen in Rust. Thanks for the review. I’m still taking the compiler’s suggestions a little too much at face value I think. I know at least a few of those clones were required to get it to compile. \$\endgroup\$ – RubberDuck Oct 4 '18 at 0:45
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @RubberDuck, ok, yes your casts need something to work. I'd do *k as char rather than k.clone() as char. \$\endgroup\$ – Winston Ewert Oct 4 '18 at 0:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh thanks! I always forget about the dereference operator! \$\endgroup\$ – RubberDuck Oct 4 '18 at 0:52

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