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I perform a mean blur on a number[][]-array (called grid in the code). I iterate the array, and calculate average values from adjacent "cells". The kernel size defines how many adjacent values are used for average calculation.

/**
 * Performs a mean blur with a given kernel size.
 * @param {number[][]} grid - Data grid holding values to blur. 
 * @param {number} kernelSize - Describes the size of the "blur"-cut for each cell.
 */
static MeanBlur(grid, kernelSize) {
    // Result
    let newGrid = [];

    // Iterate original grid
    for (let row = 0; row < grid.length; row++) {
        let newRow = [];
        for (let col = 0; col < grid[row].length; col++) {

            let adjacentValues = [];

            // Get all adjacent values
            for (let i = 1; i <= kernelSize; i++) {
                adjacentValues = adjacentValues.concat(this._getAdjacentValues(row, col, i, grid));
            }


            // Calculate average value
            const average = adjacentValues.reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0) / adjacentValues.length;

            // add average value to the current row
            newRow.push(average);
        }
        newGrid.push(newRow);
    }
    return newGrid;
}

/**
 * Return all adjacent values of a cell in a `number[][]`-array.
 * The amount of adjacent value depends on the kernel size.
 * @param {number} row - Describes the cell's row position.
 * @param {number} col - Describes the cell's column position. 
 * @param {number} kernelSize - The kernel size.
 * @param {number[][]} grid - Original data grid.
 */
static _getAdjacentValues(row, col, kernelSize, grid) {

    if (kernelSize < 1) {
        throw "Kernel size value should be at least 1.";
    }

    let adjacentValues = [];

    // north
    if (row - kernelSize >= 0) {
        adjacentValues.push(grid[row - kernelSize][col]);
    }
    // north-east
    if (row - kernelSize >= 0 && col + kernelSize < grid[row].length) {
        adjacentValues.push(grid[row - kernelSize][col + kernelSize]);
    }
    // east
    if (col + kernelSize < grid[row].length) {
        adjacentValues.push(grid[row][col + kernelSize]);
    }

    // south-east
    if (row + kernelSize < grid.length && col + kernelSize < grid[row].length) {
        adjacentValues.push(grid[row + kernelSize][col + kernelSize]);
    }

    // south
    if (row + kernelSize < grid.length) {
        adjacentValues.push(grid[row + kernelSize][col]);
    }

    // south-west
    if (row + kernelSize < grid.length && col - kernelSize >= 0) {
        adjacentValues.push(grid[row + kernelSize][col - kernelSize]);
    }

    // west
    if (col - kernelSize >= 0) {
        adjacentValues.push(grid[row][col - kernelSize]);
    }

    // north-west
    if (row - kernelSize >= 0 && col - kernelSize >= 0) {
        adjacentValues.push(grid[row - kernelSize][col - kernelSize]);
    }

    return adjacentValues;
}

What I am most concerned with is _getAdjacentValues. I think there has to be a more convenient way to get adjacent values without including values at implausible indices.

enter image description here

What I mean is that i.e. at the grid position (0, 0) even with a kernel size of 1, values like (-1, -1) will be checked automatically by a loop.

Edit: I was asked for clarification on how the kernel size actually is supposed to work. Assuming that I want to calculate the value for the current position (black cell). With a kernel size of 1 I would include all green cells for average value calculation. With a kernel size of 2 I would include all green and blue cell values. And with a kernel size of 3 all orange, blue and green cell values will be used for average calculation.

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Came here via HNQ expecting not just a blur, but a "really mean blur" from the title \$\endgroup\$ – Falco Sep 17 '18 at 12:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ Could you clarify how kernelSize should affect the results? In your implementation of _getAdjacentValues a kernel size of 2 would include cells 2 steps away but not the adjacent cells. This is not what I would expect for mean blurring. \$\endgroup\$ – Marc Rohloff Sep 17 '18 at 15:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Falco If I was wrong assuming that this is "mean blur" I can change the title. Blindman67 is suggesting that this is "Convolution Filter", is that right? \$\endgroup\$ – チーズパン Sep 17 '18 at 16:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MarcRohloff I added a more detailed explanation on how the kernel size is supposed to work. \$\endgroup\$ – チーズパン Sep 17 '18 at 16:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ I updated my code based on your comments. I assumed that you don't want to include the current cell in your mean which may or may not be true. You can use a convolution filter to solve this but I would consider it excessive unless you are already importing some sort of matrix library that does it for you. \$\endgroup\$ – Marc Rohloff Sep 17 '18 at 20:19
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Convolution Filter

In CG this type of processing is call a convolution filter and there are many strategies used to handle edges

As the previous answer points out for performance you are best to use typed arrays and avoid creating arrays for each cell you process.

In your example

for (let i = 1; i <= kernelSize; i++) {
    adjacentValues = adjacentValues.concat(this._getAdjacentValues(row, col, i, grid));
}
const average = adjacentValues.reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0) / adjacentValues.length;

You can do the reduce in the loop you create the sub array in, and avoid the 9 new arrays you create and the need to iterate again.

Example substitute value at edges.

const edgeVal = 0;
var val, sum = 0;
for (let i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
    val = grid[row + (i / 3 | 0) - 1];
    if (val !== undefined) {
         val = val[col + (i % 3) - 1];
         sum += val !== undefined ? val : edgeVal;
    } else {
         sum += edgeVal;
    }
}
const average = sum / 9;

Or ignore edges

var val;
var sum = 0;
var count = 0;
for (let i = 0; i < 9; i++) {
    val = grid[row + (i / 3 | 0) - 1];
    if (val !== undefined) {
         val = val[col + (i % 3) - 1];
         if (val !== undefined) {
            sum += val;
            count ++;
         }
    }
}
const average = sum / count;

Better yet, work on flattened arrays to avoid the double indexing for 2D arrays, and create the result array at the start rather than pushing to it each cell.

Workers

Convolution filters are ideally suited for parallel processing with an almost n / p performance increase (n is number of cells, p is number of processing nodes).

Using web workers on a i7 4 core (8 virtual cores) can give you a 8 times performance increase (On chrome (maybe others) you can get a core count at window.clientInformation.hardwareConcurrency)

Attempting to use more workers than available cores will result in slower processing.

GPU

For the ultimate performance the GPU, via webGL is available and will provide realtime processing of very large data sets (16M and above), A common non CG use is processing layers in convolutional neural network.

An example of a convolution filter (About halfway down the page) using webGL can easily be adapted to most data types, however doubles will only be available on a small number of hardware setups.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I should point out that using substitute values is not a good solution for this problem as it will affect the results of the mean calculation. \$\endgroup\$ – Marc Rohloff Sep 17 '18 at 15:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MarcRohloff That will depend on the needs of the filter, I showed two alternative solutions and linked to several more. I can not guess the needs of the OP. \$\endgroup\$ – Blindman67 Sep 17 '18 at 16:23
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Since you not only need adjacent values but also the number of adjacent cells, I do not think that there's a way to work around conditions that cover the corner cases. However, you can make a case differentiation between border cells and inner cells and use two seperate code paths for it. One with and the other without if conditions.

If accuracy at the borders is less important, you could take the grid indexes modulo width and height respectively, effectively calculating the blur over a torus. This will eliminate the if conditions.

If performance is an issue I would consider using preallocated one-dimensional TypedArrays for input and output. The resulting average should then be calculated directly from the input array and written to the output array without using intermediate lists, concat or fancy reduce functions.

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This is essentially a box blur. A box blur is separable. That means that you can significantly reduce the amount of work that you perform by first doing a horizontal-only pass with a kernel of all 1s (so for a 3x3, it would be just [1 1 1]), and then do a vertical-only pass on the result of the horizontal-only pass with the kernel rotated 90°. This website explains it pretty well:

Filtering an M-by-N image with a P-by-Q filter kernel requires roughly MNPQ multiplies and adds (assuming we aren't using an implementation based on the FFT). If the kernel is separable, you can filter in two steps. The first step requires about MNP multiplies and adds. The second requires about MNQ multiplies and adds, for a total of MN(P + Q).

The computational advantage of separable convolution versus nonseparable convolution is therefore:

For a 9-by-9 filter kernel, that's a theoretical speed-up of 4.5.

If you're going to work on the CPU, there are further techniques you can use for speed-ups, as well. Another example is to use a summed area table. In this technique, you iterate over the input image and the output image is the sum of all pixel above and to the left of the current pixel. It's very fast to calculate this. Once you have that, you can find the mean of any given pixel for an n x n area with 2 subtractions and 1 addition.

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I would generally solve this by using logic that returns undefined for edge cases (for exame grid[-1] and grid[999] return undefined) and then filtering them out. Something like

static _getAdjacentMean(row, col, kernelSize, grid) {
  let values = [];
  for (let iRow = -kernelSize; iRow <= kernelSize; iRow++) {
    const gridRow   = grid[row + iRow] || []; 
    for (let iCol = -kernelSize; iCol <= kernelSize; iCol++) {
      if (iRow !== 0 && iCol !== 0) 
        values.push( gridRow[ col + iCol ];
    }
  }  
  values = values.filter( v => v !== undefined);

  const sum   = values.reduce((a, b) => a + b, 0));
  const count = values.length;
  return sum / count;
}

or it might be more efficient just to skip the intermediate values array entirely.

static _getAdjacentMean(row, col, kernelSize, grid) {
  let sum = 0, count = 0;
  for (let iRow = -kernelSize; iRow <= kernelSize; iRow++) {
    const gridRow   = grid[row + iRow] || []; 
    for (let iCol = -kernelSize; iCol <= kernelSize; iCol++) {
      vonst cellValue = gridRow[ col + iCol];           
      if (iRow !== 0 && iCol !== 0 && cellValue !== undefined) {
        sum   += cellValue;
        count += 1;
      }
    }
  }  

  return sum / count;
}
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