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I have the following script which takes minutes to give output.

printf "\nDuplicate JS Filenames...\n"
(
  find . -name '*.js' -type f -exec basename {} \; | sort | uniq -c | grep -v "^[ \t]*1 ";
  echo "$(find . -type f -name '*.js' | wc -l) JS files in search directory";
  echo "$(find . -name '*.js' -type f -exec basename {} \; | sort | uniq -c | grep -v "^[ \t]*1 " | wc -l) duplicates found";
)

printf "\nDuplicate Java Filenames...\n"
(
  find . -name '*.java' -type f -exec basename {} \; | sort | uniq -c | grep -v "^[ \t]*1 ";
  echo "$(find . -type f -name '*.java' | wc -l) Java files in search directory";
  echo "$(find . -name '*.java' -type f -exec basename {} \; | sort | uniq -c | grep -v "^[ \t]*1 " | wc -l) duplicates found";
)

I know that I make the same request, or similar ones, a couple of times.

How could I optimize this, and maybe already the base command - I'm surprised that find takes so long, or is it due to sort, uniq, and grep?

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5
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Aside from running essentially the same find command three times, the main issue is that you run a separate basename instance for every single found file.

If you are using GNU find (verify with find --version), you can get find to print the basenames directly:

find . -name '*.js' -type f -printf '%f\n'

On my system this is about 900 times faster than calling basename when run on a directory with about 200,000 files in it.

If your system does not come with GNU find (e.g. MacOS, OpenBSD, FreeBSD) and you do not want to install it (the package is usually called findutils), you can use sed to do the same as basename but for all found files at once:

find . -name '*.js' -type f | sed 's@.*/@@'

On my system this is only slightly slower than using -printf.


If you want to reduce the amount of times you run find, you can just save the output in a variable:

filelist="$(find . -name '*.js' -type f -printf '%f\n' | sort)"
echo "$filelist" | uniq -c | grep -v "^[ \t]*1 ";
echo "$(echo "$filelist" | wc -l) JS files in search directory";
echo "$(echo "$filelist" | uniq -c | grep -v "^[ \t]*1 " | wc -l) duplicates found"

Note that on bash you need to put double-quotes around $filelist so that the newlines are not squashed.

| improve this answer | |
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Alternatively, check whether your basename accepts --multiple arguments. \$\endgroup\$ – Toby Speight Mar 22 '18 at 15:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ On my system, the answer is given now in 1.2 sec instead of 134.9 sec. Thanks a lot! And thanks for given explanations which allow me to learn at the same time... \$\endgroup\$ – user3341592 Mar 22 '18 at 15:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ A question: let's say I'm never interested in seeing some duplicate files (whose name would be hard-coded, such as package-info.java, AllTests.java and Constants.java), how could I remove those lines from the output? I guess chaining grep -v commands one after the other is not the right solution... \$\endgroup\$ – user3341592 Mar 22 '18 at 15:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Question posted as codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/190215/… \$\endgroup\$ – user3341592 Mar 22 '18 at 15:48

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