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I wrote a function that basically works like sprintf, but instead returns the formatted string (std::string). I haven't worked on this long, and I'm aware there are tons of improvements that could be made (alloc/realloc perhaps?). I was just looking for some advice before taking the next step.

GLOBAL string format(const string& format, ...)
{
    LOCAL const size_t initialSize = 64;

    string returnVal;

    char buffer[initialSize];
    int length;

    va_list args;

    va_start(args, format);
    {
        length = vsnprintf(buffer, initialSize, format.c_str(), args);
    }
    va_end(args);

    char bufferCorrectSize[length];

    va_start(args, format);
    {
        vsnprintf(bufferCorrectSize, length + 1, format.c_str(), args);
    }
    va_end(args);

    return bufferCorrectSize;
}

Ignore GLOBAL and LOCAL. They are just aliases for static I defined for organization.

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  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to Code Review! Good job on your first question. \$\endgroup\$ – SirPython Jan 3 '16 at 23:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you very much! I only discovered Code Review 10 minutes ago. \$\endgroup\$ – oliveryas01 Jan 3 '16 at 23:08
8
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Don't invent your own language through macros

GLOBAL and LOCAL might look cute but they make the code harder to read for everyone else. Not to mention the name-space pollution caused by such macros.

You say that they both expand to static. That seems wrong. A function declared static is not “very global” – it is private to its translation unit. A local variable declared static is not “very local” – it is shared between all invocations of the function. This also seems wrong. If you want to use format as a library function, it shouldn't be static. And declaring the integer initialSize as static seems pointless at best.

#include all required headers

Probably you have just left it out of your question but your code should always #include all required header files. In your case, that would be

  • <cstdio> for std::vsnprintf,
  • <string> for std::string,
  • <cstddef> for std::size_t and
  • <cstdarg> for va_start, va_end and std::va_list.

Since you're using string without the std:: qualifier, I assume you also have a using namespace std; somewhere in your code. Get rid of it and type the extra five characters instead. It makes it clearer where the types are coming from and doesn't pollute the global name-space.

Use namespaces to organize your functions

Maybe you just didn't show it but you should put everything except main in some namespace. Instead of declaring stuff static, consider using an anonymous namespace. But since your function ought to be useful in multiple translation units, it probably shouldn't be static anyway.

Properly allocate and deallocate dynamic memory

The line

char bufferCorrectSize[length];

is not correct. (Your compiler should have warned you about it.) In C++, an array must have a fixed size known at compile-time. Since the value of length is only obtained at run-time from a previous function call, this is not possible. You could dynamically allocate a buffer of the wanted size using

char * bufferCorrectSize = new char[length];

and release it again once you're done with it.

delete[] bufferCorrectSize;

But this leaves you with all kinds of memory management issues. So instead of managing it yourself, use a std::vector<char>.

Unfortunately, you cannot use the std::string directly because its data member function will only give you a const buffer. If you know exactly what you're doing, you can take the address of the first character of the string and use it a s a pointer to a writable buffer. But I'd rather not play such tricks unless you're comfortable with what you're doing and the additional performance is critical.

Don't repeat yourself

You're calling std::vsnprintf twice; basically with the same arguments. Also, there is no need to call it again if the buffer was large enough the first time. You can re-factor this into a loop.

Get rid of the useless nested scope

While a nested scope { … } can be useful from time to time, in your case, it serves no purpose. You're not even declaring any variables inside it.

Handle errors properly

If std::vsnprintf encounters an error, it will return a negative number. You should test for this and properly handle the error. throwing an exception is probably an adequate reaction. Don't forget to still call va_end in this case.

Handle embedded NUL bytes correctly

You're returning bufferCorrectSize which will decay to char *. Unlike others have commented, this is not returning a pointer to a local object. Since format is declared with a return type of std::string and the latter is implicitly constructible from a const char *, you're safely returning the std::string as intended. However, if there is a NUL byte somewhere in the buffer, you'll truncate. Therefore, you should use the constructor taking a pointer and a length and call it explicitly.

Eliminate unused variables

The variable returnVal is never used. Your compiler might be able to warn you about this.

Make debugging easier with function attributes

The C-style printf family of functions has a bad reputation of being notoriously not type-safe and responsible for numerous bugs that can lead to serious security holes. A good compiler like GCC can warn you if such a function is called with arguments that do not match the type specifiers in the format string. You can enable the same warnings for your function, too. Of course, GCC can only check the arguments if it can see the format string. Using an untrusted format string is a very bad idea anyway so you should consider making it a const char *. If somebody really wants to call your function with a computed format string, they can always obtain a C-style string via the c_str member function of std::string. This will give them the compiler warning they deserve so they can think twice about their decision. Having format accept a std::string as format string also leads to the false assumption that one can embed NUL characters in it. But since you're going to call c_str on it anyway, std::vsnprintf will only ever see a NUL terminated string. Making the type of the format string const char * avoids this confusion.

The following annotation informs GCC that the function accepts a printf-style format string as parameter number 1 and parameters 2 and following are the format arguments.

std::string
format(const char *const format, ...)
  __attribute__ ((format (printf, 1, 2)));

See the GCC manual for more information about the (arguably messy) syntax.

Document your interface

Add a comment to the declaration of each public function that describes precisely how to use it.

Putting it all together

Combining all of the above advice, we end up with the following two files.

my_format.hxx:

#ifndef MY_FORMAT_HXX
#define MY_FORMAT_HXX

#include <string>  // std::string

namespace my
{

  /**
   * @brief
   *         Like `std::sprintf` except that the formatted string is `return`ed
   *         as a `std::string`.
   *
   * This function internally forwards to `std::vsnprintf`.  It accepts the
   * exact same parameters and has the exact same gotchas as that function
   * except that allocating a buffer of sufficient size is done automatically.
   *
   * @param format
   *         C-style format string
   *
   * @param ...
   *         any format arguments required by the given format string
   *
   * @returns
   *         the formatted string
   *
   * @throws std::runtime_error
   *         if `std::vsnprintf` fails
   *
   * @throws std::bad_alloc
   *         if insufficient memory is available
   *
   */
  std::string
  format(const char *const format, ...)
    __attribute__ ((format (printf, 1, 2)));

}  // namespace my

#endif  // #ifndef MY_FORMAT_HXX

my_format.cxx:

#include "my_format.hxx"

#include <cstdarg>    // va_start, va_end, std::va_list
#include <cstddef>    // std::size_t
#include <stdexcept>  // std::runtime_error
#include <vector>     // std::vector

namespace my
{

  std::string
  format(const char *const format, ...)
  {
    auto temp = std::vector<char> {};
    auto length = std::size_t {63};
    std::va_list args;
    while (temp.size() <= length)
      {
        temp.resize(length + 1);
        va_start(args, format);
        const auto status = std::vsnprintf(temp.data(), temp.size(), format, args);
        va_end(args);
        if (status < 0)
          throw std::runtime_error {"string formatting error"};
        length = static_cast<std::size_t>(status);
      }
    return std::string {temp.data(), length};
  }

}  // namespace my
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you very much. A lot of useful info. Half of it I actually added after I posted, such as proper allocation \$\endgroup\$ – oliveryas01 Jan 6 '16 at 1:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ What exactly is 'attribute'? \$\endgroup\$ – oliveryas01 Jan 10 '16 at 9:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's a compiler-specific extension to the C++ language to allow specifying additional information about a function. Please see the link in the answer. \$\endgroup\$ – 5gon12eder Jan 11 '16 at 0:26
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  • Do not return local array

        char bufferCorrectSize[length];
        ....
        return bufferCorrectSize;
    

    The bufferCorrectSize is DOA: it goes out of scope when the function returns. The caller obtains some address, with nothing behind it. You must make it with bufferCorrectSize = new char[length].

  • Initial array is superfluous

    Nothing is ever done with buffer. nullptr is as good.

  • length + 1

    The target area is length bytes long, but you promise to vsnprintf that it has a length + 1 arena to play with.

  • Nit pick

    An unnecessary scoping like { length = ... } looks really strange.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Note that the function's return type is std::string which has a constructor taking a const char *. Writing return bufferCorrectSize; implicitly calls that constructor while the buffer is still good and then returns the std::string so this part is (maybe accidentally) safe. There are other problems with the code, however. \$\endgroup\$ – 5gon12eder Jan 4 '16 at 12:27
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If you want to return the string then resize it explicitly instead of relying in the implicit construction in the return:

returnVal.resize(length);

va_start(args, format);
{
    vsnprintf(returnVal.data(), length + 1, format.c_str(), args);
}
va_end(args);

return returnVal;
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Unfortunately, c_str returns a const char * sou you cannot pass it to vsnprintf as buffer. \$\endgroup\$ – 5gon12eder Jan 4 '16 at 12:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ @5gon12eder use data() then or &returnVal.front() \$\endgroup\$ – ratchet freak Jan 4 '16 at 12:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ Too bad, data is also const. &returnVal[0] could work but it seems dangerous. It actually makes sense to forbid writing to a std::string's bytes since doing so could silently invalidate the length of the string. \$\endgroup\$ – 5gon12eder Jan 4 '16 at 12:30

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