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I just released a book with a deadline. My first job with LaTeX, very messy. I wondered if there is anybody out there, who would be so kind and take a look at the code and see, what optimizations can be done. I am releasing the same book in Danish/Latin (as you see, the code is in English/Latin) and I would like to have a better, more customizable code.

I know that I should clean up the \\ at the end of the paragraphs. My main concern is to not have to separate the actual text for every page, as is necessary right now. But I would really like to have the whole code cleaned up!

\documentclass[a4paper,twoside]{book}

\usepackage[english,ngerman]{babel}
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\usepackage[left=101pt,right=101pt,top=96pt,bottom=96pt]{geometry}
\usepackage{wrapfig,booktabs}
\usepackage{fancyhdr}
\usepackage[autostyle,german=quotes]{csquotes}
\usepackage{array,tabularht}
\usepackage{floatrow}
\usepackage{hyperref}
\usepackage{afterpage}

\pagestyle{fancy}
\fancyhf{}
\fancyhead[LE]{Nicolaus Cusanus}
\fancyhead[RO]{Nicholas of Cusa}
\fancyhead[RE]{Epistula ad Nicolaum Bononiensem}
\fancyhead[LO]{Letter to Nicholas of Bologna}
\fancyfoot[CE,CO]{\leftmark}
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\hypersetup{
colorlinks=false,
pdfborder={0 0 0},
}

\begin{document}

\begin{otherlanguage}{english}

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{\centering
{\huge Nicholas of Cusa\par}
\vspace{1.0cm}
{\huge Letter to Nicholas of Bologna\par}
\vspace{1.0cm}
{\huge June 11, 1463\par}
}
\vspace*{\fill}

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{\centering
{\huge \textit{to Asuka and Daniel},\par}
\vspace{0.5cm}
{\huge \textit{that you may live happily ever after!}\par}
\vspace{1.0cm}
}
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{\centering\LARGE
Now united, two in one,\\
life, anew, has just begun.\\
Thus united, one of two,\\
there are risks! Now, what to do?\\
Poverty may come to haunt you,\\
enemies may come to daunt you,\\
let them meet two hearts, so pure,\\
one in love, they will endure.\\
Never shy, always brave,\\
remembering the pledge you gave.\\
Now united, one in God,\\
don't forget what Cusa thought:\\
\enquote{If you really want to live,\\
all you have to do, is give.}\\
}
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\section*{A short introduction}

    This work has been translated for the praise of God and all who praises Him, in particular a very special couple, \textit{Asuka} and \textit{Daniel}, whom I have the great honor to be able to call my friends. I hope this translation will bring you as much joy as it has brought me. Whereas an introduction to \textit{Nicholas of Cusa} is beyond the scope of this publication, it can be said that anyone honestly dedicating their lives to accomplish for mankind what Cusa envisioned so many centuries ago, are not just most truly human, most truly alive and most truly wise, but they are bringing themselves into the best possible and most pleasant company.

    I want to thank \textit{Steve Mendoza} for proofreading this translation at the shortest notice and with great enthusiasm, and likewise I want to thank \textit{Gorm Torzen} of the \textit{University of Copenhagen}, Denmark, for helping me out, when I was not able to fully see through the meaning of the Latin text. I would also not have been able to finish this work without all the good people from the \textit{University of Trier}, Germany, that has done an immense work of creating \textit{the} online home for the publications of Cusa, \url{http://cusanus-portal.de}. Obviously, it has also been of great help to be able to cross-check my translations of single words and phrases with the almost complete English translations of the works of Cusa made freely available online by \textit{Jasper Hopkins}. To you, my dear Lissie, I will also give thanks for your support and help throughout the sometimes overly time-consuming work!

    But first and foremost I want to thank \textit{Helga Zepp-LaRouche} and \textit{Lyndon LaRouche} for saving Cusa from a sleep-like life of endless analysis in the the hands of some closed academic circles, concentrated in a few university faculties spread out around the world, and bringing him out into the bright daylight where he belongs, once more making him a key figure in the daily actions that shape the future of what we know as mankind. Without you, I would never have known Cusa as anything else than another old sometime philosopher among the countless masses.

\subsection*{A bit of background to the letter}

    Together with \textit{Compendium} and \textit{De apice theoriae} this work comprises the very last writings that Cusa completed before his death on August 11, 1464. After his near death on June 15, 1461, Cusa knew he was getting physically weaker, even as his health allowed him to travel in the summer of 1463, and these three works can be seen as three different approaches to summarizing his intention and vision for mankind that he was incessantly working to realize throughout his life, especially form 1433 on.

    On June 5, 1463, Cusa clothed the young, unknown student, \textit{Nicholas of Bologna}, also known as \textit{Nicholas Albergati}, in the monastic habit of the the renown monastery—\textit{Pope Pius II} visited and praised it in 1462—\textit{Montoliveto}, \textit{Of the Mount of Olives}. Cusa, housing in Montepulciano at the time, arrived at the monastery on July 3, 1463, and left again a weeks time later to arrive back in Montepulciano at the latest in time to write the present letter on June 11. Although, in the accompanying sermon and in this letter, it becomes clear that there is a warm relationship between the young man and Cusa, the nature of this relation has yet to be found. Von Bredow assumes a familiar relation between the young monk and \textit{Cardinal Nicholas Albergati} with whom Cusa had been working closely for many years.

    The far greater part of the known works of Cusa has come down to us in the major collections compiled several times from the late 15th century and on. That is not the case with this letter. It was found in 1949 by a scholar of Renaissance humanism, \textit{Paul O. Kristeller}, in the public library of Siena (\textit{Biblioteca Comunale}) as he was systematically searching through the Italian libraries for his research. Together with the letter was a description of the sermon that Cusa held in connection with the clothing of Nicholas of Bologna. This sermon is found in English in Jasper Hopkins' translation (Sermon CCXCIII). In reading this description we find out why we do not hear about this pious monk again; he dies in the monastery a few months after his ceremony.

    The letter itself was published together with a German translation in 1955 by \textit{Gerda von Bredow}. The same translation was later republished in an abridged version in 1957. It was re-translated by \textit{Harald Schwaetzer} and \textit{Kirstin Zeyer} and published in 2006. In the meantime a Japanese translation was published in 2001 but the letter has never been published in English, although \textit{Dr. Thomas Izbicki} has done a sketchy translation from the German—which he was so friendly as to share with me—excerpted by \textit{Morimichi Watanabe}, the long time president of \textit{The American Cusanus Society}, in his \textit{Nicholas of Cusa – A Companion to his Life and his Times}, published in 2011, shortly before the latter's own death in 2012.
      \textit{Josef Koch}, one of the great Cusa scholars and the teacher of von Bredow, called this letter \enquote{das religiöse Testament}, \enquote{the religious last will} of Cusa. I will not go further into the content of the letter or the sermon, since it makes far more sense to read the two documents oneself.

\thispagestyle{empty}
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\subsection*{A few technical details}

    I have printed the Latin original on the left and the English translation on the right hand pages of this little book. You will notice that the Latin has two line numbering systems. The numbers to the left are the regular line numbers, also used for referencing, the right numbers are the line numbers of von Bredow's publication of the work. I have copied all the references from von Bredow's 1955 edition into the critical apparatus. With one exception (see \Lr{M1}) that is all I have copied from there, the rest must be found in the original using the left hand number system. All references from Bredow are marked with an asterisk (*). The Latin text itself is Bredow's 1955 edition copied from \url{http://cusanus-portal.de} and unchanged with one exception (see \Lr{D5}). For all the publications used for this translation, see the list at the end.

\subsection*{Finishing Cusa's project}

    Before ending this short introduction, I want to emphasize one aspect of the core of Cusa's spirit which will never cease to fascinate me: His firm believe that every human being has the ability to form the most perfect union with Christ, who has the most perfect union with God. That is, every human being has the potential to reflect in him the most fundamental nature of this universe. There is noting in it, that he cannot come to know, and know in such a way that he can create it. That is the value of every human being. And any society, so he believes, should be organized to bring forth that potential. There could be no better time than now to hold up this mirror for oneself and ask: \enquote{Is my society organized in such a way? Am I working to accomplish that?} With the translation of this letter, I hope that I have brought the world a small step closer to Cusa's goal.\\

Have fun reading!\\

October 12, 2015\par

Essen

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{\centering
translator\par
Hans Frederik Ross Nielsen\par
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}
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\newpage

\thispagestyle{empty}
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{\centering
{\huge Nicholas of Cusa\par}
\vspace{1.0cm}
{\huge Letter to Nicholas of Bologna\par}
}
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\end{otherlanguage}

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    Epistola reverendissimi in Christo patris domini Nicolai, cardinalis\\
sancti Petri ad vincula, ad religiosum Nicolaum, novitium Montisoliveti\\
ut quantum sufficit se ipsum cognoscat.

    1. Placuit deo et religiosis fratribus, ut te Nicolaum Bononiensem, zelo-\\
sum adolescentem, in sancta die beatissimae trinitatis in nominatissimo\\
monasterio Montisoliveti monastico illius loci habitu vestirem ac aliqua\\
dicerem ad tui fervoris augmentum, quae nunc in scriptis redegi quibus-\\
dam instantibus devotis, ut memoriale ipsorum tecum retineas, aliqua illis\\
de dei laudibus, in quibus vere religiosi apprime versantur, adiciens, ut\\
completiori doctrina quae dixi degustes.

    2. Oportet igitur primum ut diligenter attendas. Cum nihil omnium\\
quae comprehendi possunt careat esse et ipsum quod sunt non possint a\\
se ipsis habere (quomodo enim non exsistens se ipsum crearet ut esset?),\\
hinc ante omnia quae facta sunt necesse est aeternum esse omnium creato-\\
rem, a quo omnia id quod sunt habent.

    3. Nihil enim movit creatorem, ut hoc universum conderet pulcherri-\\
mum opus, nisi laus et gloria sua quam ostendere voluit; finis igitur crea-\\
tionis ipse est qui et principium. Et quia omnis rex incognitus est sine\\
laude et gloria, cognosci voluit omnium creator, ut gloriam suam ostendere\\
posset. Hinc qui voluit cognosci creavit intellectualem naturam cognitionis\\
capacem.

    4. Ipse igitur ut est finis intellectualis naturae, sic etiam ipsa intellec-\\
tualis natura finis est omnis sensibilis et inferioris naturae. Omnia igitur\\
visibilia, elementa et vegetabilia, sunt sensibilibus conexa et illa sensi-\\
bilia homini ut fini suo. Nam in homine animalis vita in intellectuali est\\
inserta, quae solum est capax cognitionis gloriae et laudis, sine qua omnia\\
sensibilia fine carerent.

    5. Constringit igitur creator omnia sensibilia, caelum et terram et quae\\
in eis sunt, amoroso nexu rationali naturae, ut serviant homini, in quo est\\
viva dei imago. Quae dum se cognoscit vivam sui creatoris imaginem,\\
modo se ipsam respiciens creatorem suum contemplatur, quando ex simi-\\
litudine in exemplar rapitur.

    6. Adverte, fili, ad vivam dei intellectualem imaginem in te exsisten-\\
tem, quae non esset viva intellectualis imago, si se non cognosceret ima-\\
ginem. Intellectus igitur est de essentia vivae dei imaginis. Unde inter\\
illam imaginem dei et aliam dei similitudinem, sine qua nulla potest esse\\
creatura, hoc interest quod nulla similitudo praeter illam habet scientiam\\
se dei esse similitudinem, quando vita intellectuali caret.

    7. Cuncta vero creata in eo quod habent quiescunt, nihil ultra receptum,\\
speciem divinae similitudinis, appetentia, cum per illam id sint quod sunt,\\
sine qua nihil forent. Nostra autem intellectualis natura, cum se dei vivam\\
imaginem intelligat, potestatem habet continue clarior et deo conforma-\\
tior fieri, licet, cum sit imago, nunquam fiat exemplar aut creator.

    8. Sicut si pictor sui ipsius visibilem imaginem dipingit, illa\\
manet ut facta est, sed si foret talis pictor, qui artis suae intellectualis pin-\\
gendi intellectualem et invisibilem imaginem facere posset, utique illa imago\\
artis, si perfecta foret imago intellectualis et vivae artis, se ipsam cla-\\
riorem et similiorem facere posset, quando se suo factori conformaret.

\newpage
\begin{otherlanguage}{english}
    Letter from the most venerable father in Christ, Lord Nicholas, Cardinal at St. Peter in Chains, to the pious Nicholas, novice \textit{Of the Mount of Olives}, that he might sufficiently recognize himself.

    1. It was pleasing to God and the religious brothers that I clothed you, Nicholas of Bologna, a zealous youth, on the holy day of the most blessed Trinity at the renowned monastery \textit{Of the Mount of Olives} in the monastic habit of that place, and that I furthermore held a sermon for the increase of your fervor. I have now written down this sermon at the insistence of some devout men, that you may take it with you. And in order for you to taste a more complete doctrine than the one I spoke, I have added something about the primary subject with which the pious engage themselves: the praises of God.

    2. First, it is necessary that you diligently consider the following: Since nothing which can be comprehended is without existence, and since the very things that are, cannot have existence from themselves—how, indeed, would the non-existing make itself exist?—it is necessary that an eternal creator of everything exist before everything else, from whom everything has begotten its existence.

    3. But nothing moved the Creator to create this universe, the most beautiful work, besides His wish to extend His praise and glory. He is thus Himself the purpose of creation and also its origin. And since any unrecognized king is without praise and glory, the Creator wished to become recognized in order to extend His glory. Thus He, who wished to become recognized, created the reasonable nature capable of cognition.

    4. And as He is the purpose of reasonable nature, so is the reasonable nature the purpose of all sensing and lower natures. Likewise, everything visible, the inorganic as well as the vegetal, is related to the sensing nature and the sensing nature to mankind by their purpose. So, in a human being the animal life is intermingled with the reasonable, of which the latter alone can recognize glory and praiseworthiness, without which everything perceptible would have no purpose.

    5. Thus, the Creator binds all perceptible things, heaven, earth, and all that is in them, together with the rational nature, by a loving bond, that they may serve mankind, in whom is the living image of God. When a human being recognizes itself as a living image of its creator, it contemplates its creator by looking back at itself, being led to the original by way of the likeness.

    6. Observe, my son, the living, reasonable image existing in you of God, which would be no living, reasonable image, if this image wouldn't recognize itself as being an image. Thus reason belongs to the essence of the living image of God. Whence, knowledge of being in the likeness of God, which no other likeness than this image has, stands between this image of God and any other likeness of him, without which no creation could exist.

    7. Every created being truly rests in what it has; no kind of being desires greater likeness to the creator than what it has received, since it exists through that likeness, and couldn't exist without it. But our reasonable nature, since it understands itself to be the living image of God, has the power to become ever more manifest and more in the shape of the Creator. Although, since it is an image, it can never become the original or the Creator itself.

    8. Thus, if a painter paints his own visible image, it remains as it was made. But if such a painter existed, who could paint the act of painting from his reason as an invisible picture of reason, that picture of the act of painting, if it was a perfect picture of the reason and life of the act of painting, it could make itself more manifest and more similar by shaping itself like its creator.
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    70. Oportet, fili, te toto conatu imitari Christum et in te mundi concu-\\
piscentiam seu vitam cum certamine maximo mortificare, ut sis perfectus\\
monachus, qui est mundo mortuus. Et quamvis non longe a Simone\\
Petro, Iacobo et Iohanne, qui sunt columnae religionis, sit etiam in ora-\\
tione recedendum, oboedientia enim Simonis, supplantatio temporalium\\
Iacobi et castitas Iohannis omnem monachum associare debent, tamen\\
excellentia fervoris orationis etiam illos ad tempus licentiat. Omnia linquit\\
agonizans et ab omnibus abstinet, ut agonem victoriose perficiat.

    71. Vide, fili, quam imperterrite ad crucis mortem accessit Christus, quia\\
vicit in agone voluntas Dei voluntatem hominis. Quamdiu in homine vivit\\
propria voluntas, sub potestate est maligni et vivit in eo mundus. In eo\\
vero, in quo voluntas Dei dominatur, propria voluntas victa est ac mortua.\\
Fac igitur, ut mortifices propriam voluntatem et in te vivat voluntas Chri-\\
sti victoris et eius legati, scilicet patris religionis, secundum voluntatem\\
Christi in tibi praelato movearis et ad cuncta sine omni retinentia quasi\\
iumentum dirigaris.

    72. Ut sis liber, te facito servum, nam perfecta oboedientia te liberat. Ut\\
non obligeris ad rationem in districto iudicio ad omnia respondebis: Non\\
feci a me ipso quidquam, sed voluntatem tuam, quam mihi dux religionis\\
notificavit, ut potui sum exsecutus. Maximum est hoc religiosorum privi-\\
legium habere continue Christum in praelato praesentem, ut in se mortuus\\
per praelatum in Christo vivat nunc et in perpetuum.

    73. Haec sic, ut Deus dedit, ex dilectione, quam ad sacram tuam gero\par
\noindent religionem atque personam tuam mihi plurimum acceptam, conscripsi, ut\\
magis obligeris et movearis mei memoriam in tuis sanctis facere oratio-\\
nibus, quibus et fratrum omnium me devote recommitto.\\

{\centering
Ex Montepoliciano die sabbati infra octavas\par
corporis Christi 1463.\par
}

\newpage
\begin{otherlanguage}{english}
    70. It is necessary, my son, that you invest your entire effort in imitating Christ, and that you enter into the greatest struggle to purge the earthly desire and life in order to become a perfect monk, who is dead for the world. And although one should not step too far away from Simon, Peter, Jacob and John, the four columns of faith—the obedience of Simon, the supply of necessities by Jacob and the chastity of John should always follow a monk—one should nevertheless sometimes dismiss those too, in order to commit oneself fully to prayer. The struggling monk will leave everything behind and abstain from it all, in order to be victorious in his fight.

    71. Look, my son, how even-tempered Christ was walking to the death on the cross, because the will of God conquered the will of the human being. As long as its own will lives in the human being, it is under the power of evil and lives on this earth. But in the one whose will is ruled by God, the own will is defeated and dead. Therefore, make sure to purge your own will and make the will of Christ, the victor, live in you and that of His representative, that is the father of the order. Let yourself be moved by the will of Christ through your superior, and fully direct yourself according to it, without any reservation, like a beast of burden.

    72. Enslave yourself to gain freedom, for perfect obedience will make you free. Then on the day of reckoning, without reservation, you may tell the strict jury: \enquote{I did nothing out of myself, but out of Your will, which the leader of the order made known to me, and which I executed to the best of my ability.} This is the greatest privilege of the pious; to continually follow Christ in his superior, that he himself might be dead, but through the superior live in Christ, now and for eternity.

    73. This I wrote, as it was given by God, out of the love that I carry for your holy order and for you personally, who is dear to me, that you may become more tied to me and move yourself to make mention of me in your holy prayers, in which I also devotedly recommend that you make mention of all the holy brothers with me.\\

{\centering
Montepulciano, the Saturday of the Octave of\par
the Feast of Corpus Christi, 1463\par
}

\afterpage{\blankpagenumber}

\begin{thebibliography}{9}
\thispagestyle{empty}
\bibitem{Handbuch}
  Brösch/Euler/Geissler/Ranff,
  \emph{Handbuch Nikolaus von Kues},
  Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, Darmstadt,
  2014.

\bibitem{Hopkins}
  Jasper Hopkins,
  \emph{Nicholas of Cusa},
  Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York,
  1987.\\
  Online: \url{...}
  And quite a few translations of the works of Cusa on \url{...}

\bibitem{Bibliography}
  Michael Buhlmann,
  \emph{Nikolaus von Kues – Kirchenmann, Theologe, Philosoph},
  Online: \url{http://www.michael-buhlmann.de/PDF_Texte/mbhp_bgkw18a_pdf.pdf}

\bibitem{Companion}
  Morimichi Watanabe,
  \emph{Nicholas of Cusa – A Companion to his Life and his Times},
  Ashgate Publishing Company, Burlington,
  2011.

\bibitem{Bredow}
  Gerda von Bredow,
  \emph{Das Vermächtnis des Nikolaus von Kues, Der Brief an Nikolaus Albergati nebst der Predigt in Montoliveto (1463)},
  Carl Winter Universitätsverlag, Heidelberg,
  1955.

\bibitem{Euler}
  Walter Andreas Euler,
  \emph{Does Nicholas Cusanus Have a Theology of the Cross},
  The Journal of Religion, Vol. 80, No. 3 (Jul., 2000), pp. 405-420, The University of Chicago Press.

\bibitem{portal}
  Instituts für Cusanus-Forschung an der Universität/der Theologischen Fakultät Trier,
  \emph{\url{http://www.cusanus-portal.de}/},
  Institut für Cusanus-Forschung, Trier.

  \bibitem{Blumenberg}
  Hans Blumenberg,
  \emph{Nikolaus von Kues - Die Kunst der Vermutung},
  Carl Schünemann Verlag, Bremen,
  1957.

  \bibitem{2006}
  Harald Schwaetzer/Kirstin Zeyer,
  \emph{Nikolaus von Kues - Textauswahl in deutscher Übersetzung, Heft 7},
  Paulinus-Verlag, Trier,
  2006.

\end{thebibliography}
\end{otherlanguage}

\end{document}
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2
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I'm not a LaTex expert by any means, but I think I can help with this. First, it's important to step back and remember the original purpose for LaTeX. Quoting from https://www.latex-project.org/

LaTeX is not a word processor! Instead, LaTeX encourages authors not to worry too much about the appearance of their documents but to concentrate on getting the right content.

That's what makes it so useful and flexible. The LaTeX in your book, on the other hand, spends much too much effort on the appearance, and so while you have succeeded with Herculean effort, you will find things much easier and much more pleasing if you work with LaTeX instead of against it. I hope to help you think of ways to do that with the following review.

Think about your requirements

Think about what you are trying to do. Essentially, you are writing a translation of one document into another language. The structure of the document is such that you'd also like to retain both ties to the original source material (the Bredow text) and to the translated text. Your choice of using facing pages for original/translation (Latin/English in this case) is an appropriate choice with a long history in literature. Keeping the whole picture in mind is useful in many projects, and this one is no exception.

Consider the user interface

Unlike a lot of code here on Code Review, you are effectively both the programmer and the user of this, which offers great opportunity to tune things exactly to your preferences. The way the current document is written is very much page-based rather than content-based. It seems to me that it would be much easier to instead work on translating paragraph at a time and letting LaTeX worry about pagination. To that end, I would recommend the use of the paracol package.

Use the right languages

Because you're writing in Latin and English for this document, you should specify those as the languages for babel:

\usepackage[latin,english]{babel}

Use annotation for source linkage

Instead of manually laying out a column to refer to original source material page and line numbering, better would be to define a command to represent the left text, the source line number and the right (translated) text. Here's one way to do that using the paracol package:

\newcommand\LR[3]{\selectlanguage{latin}#1 \marginpar{\tiny #2}\switchcolumn
    \selectlanguage{english} #3 \switchcolumn}

Sample document

\documentclass[a4paper,twoside]{book}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}
\usepackage[latin,english]{babel}
\usepackage{fancyhdr}
\usepackage{paracol,lineno}

\pagestyle{fancy}
\fancyhf{}
\fancyhead[LE]{Nicolaus Cusanus}
\fancyhead[RO]{Nicholas of Cusa}
\fancyhead[RE]{Epistula ad Nicolaum Bononiensem}
\fancyhead[LO]{Letter to Nicholas of Bologna}
\fancyfoot[CE,CO]{\leftmark}
\fancyfoot[LE,RO]{\thepage}

\linenumbers \modulolinenumbers[5]
\setlength\linenumbersep{1em}
\newcommand\LR[3]{\selectlanguage{latin}#1 \marginpar{\tiny #2}\switchcolumn
    \selectlanguage{english} #3 \switchcolumn}

\title{Letter to Nicholas of Bologna}
\author{Nicholas of Cusa}
\date{June 11, 1463}

\begin{document}
\makeatletter
\begin{titlepage}
\begin{centering}
\nolinenumbers
{\huge
\@title

\@author

\@date

Translation by Hans Frederik Ross Nielsen }
\end{centering}
\end{titlepage}
\makeatother
\reversemarginpar
\linenumbers
\begin{paracol}[1]*{2}
    \LR{Epistola reverendissimi in Christo patris domini 
    Nicolai, cardinalis sancti Petri ad vincula, ad religiosum Nicolaum,
    novitium Montisoliveti ut quantum sufficit se ipsum cognoscat.}{26}{ 
    Letter from the most venerable father in Christ, Lord Nicholas, Cardinal
    at St. Peter in Chains, to the pious Nicholas, novice \textit{Of the
    Mount of Olives}, that he might sufficiently recognize himself.}
    \LR{ 1.  Placuit deo et religiosis fratribus, ut te Nicolaum Bononiensem, 
    zelosum adolescentem, in sancta die beatissimae trinitatis in nominatissimo 
    monasterio Montisoliveti monastico illius loci habitu vestirem ac aliqua 
    dicerem ad tui fervoris augmentum, quae nunc in scriptis redegi quibusdam 
    instantibus devotis, ut memoriale ipsorum tecum retineas, aliqua illis de 
    dei laudibus, in quibus vere religiosi apprime versantur, adiciens, ut 
    completiori doctrina quae dixi degustes.}
   {26.5}
   { 1. It was pleasing to God and the religious brothers that I clothed
    you, Nicholas of Bologna, a zealous youth, on the holy day of the most
    blessed Trinity at the renowned monastery \textit{Of the Mount of
    Olives} in the monastic habit of that place, and that I furthermore held
    a sermon for the increase of your fervor. I have now written down this
    sermon at the insistence of some devout men, that you may take it with
    you. And in order for you to taste a more complete doctrine than the one
    I spoke, I have added something about the primary subject with which the
    pious engage themselves: the praises of God.}
    \LR{3. Nihil enim movit creatorem, ut hoc universum conderet
    pulcherrimum opus, nisi laus et gloria sua quam ostendere voluit; finis
    igitur creationis ipse est qui et principium. Et quia omnis rex
    incognitus est sine laude et gloria, cognosci voluit omnium creator, ut
    gloriam suam ostendere posset. Hinc qui voluit cognosci creavit
    intellectualem naturam cognitionis capacem.}{26.15}{ 3. But nothing
    moved the Creator to create this universe, the most beautiful work,
    besides His wish to extend His praise and glory. He is thus Himself the
    purpose of creation and also its origin. And since any unrecognized king
    is without praise and glory, the Creator wished to become recognized in
    order to extend His glory. Thus He, who wished to become recognized,
    created the reasonable nature capable of cognition.}
    \end{paracol}
\end{document}
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for your thorough contribution! I really like the paracol function as you implement it. However, I see two issues that I am not able to resolve myself. Maybe you can help: 1) Now, instead of having to copy/paste every page of text, I have to copy paste every paragraph of text. This could seem like almost more work than before. I am going to use this as a template for future translations, and am therefore seeking to reduce the workflow as much as possible. My hope is to be able to copy paste the whole text in one action, if possible. \$\endgroup\$ – H. Nielsen Dec 2 '15 at 11:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ 2) The way your code works, I can't see how the original line-numbers can be put on every fifth line. If you look at the rendering here overleaf.com/3829173hptsfm, they come out after every paragraph. how could that be corrected? \$\endgroup\$ – H. Nielsen Dec 2 '15 at 11:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm not sure I completely understand your question about copy/paste. What are you copying from and pasting to in this? If you mean that copying from your original version to a version like this will be tedious, yes, I'd agree. I'd probably write software to convert it rather than doing it manually. \$\endgroup\$ – Edward Dec 2 '15 at 12:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ As for the numbering, the lineno package takes care of numbering the lines. If you wish to maintain links back to the source, I'd recommend having them at paragraph level. Otherwise, you'll have to maintain the lines precisely as they were in the source, and you're back to where you started, and LaTeX is not going to be of much help to you. \$\endgroup\$ – Edward Dec 2 '15 at 12:39

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