Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (SICP) is a classic textbook for learning how to program. The language used in the book is Scheme, a dialect of Lisp.

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Filter a list with given predicate - python [closed]

For the following question, the function • should mutate the original list • should NOT create any new lists • should NOT return anything Function that do not create new lists ...
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Shift elements left by n indices in a list

For the following question, the function • should mutate the original list • should NOT create any new lists • should NOT return anything Functions that do not create new lists ...
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1answer
77 views

Interval multiplication - faster version

For the below given problem from this assignment: Q4. In passing, Ben also cryptically comments, "By testing the signs of the endpoints of the intervals, it is possible to break ...
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Is there something wrong with my remove-duplicates implementation in Scheme?

For an assignment I handed in this code to remove duplicates from a stream. ...
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58 views

SICP Exercise 1.3: Sum of squares of two largest numbers out of three, Prolog Version

The exercise 1.3 of the book Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs asks the following: Exercise 1.3. Define a procedure that takes three numbers as arguments and returns the sum of ...
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SICP Exercise 1.3: Sum of squares of two largest numbers out of three, Rust Version

The exercise 1.3 of the book Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs asks the following: Exercise 1.3. Define a procedure that takes three numbers as arguments and returns the sum of ...
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SICP Exercise 1.3: Sum of squares of two largest numbers out of three, Haskell Version

The exercise 1.3 of the book Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs asks the following: Exercise 1.3. Define a procedure that takes three numbers as arguments and returns the sum of ...
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3answers
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SICP Exercise 1.3: Sum of squares of two largest numbers out of three

The exercise 1.3 of the book Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs asks the following: Exercise 1.3. Define a procedure that takes three numbers as arguments and returns the sum of ...
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1answer
60 views

SICP streams in C++

To brush up on my C++ chops, I've implemented a toy version of "SICP Streams", which behave like lists with one twist: the first element of the list is always available, the rest of the list is stored ...
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Building Data abstraction and ADT for rectangle using “objects”

For the below given exercise: Exercise 7: Abstracting Rectangles Implement a representation for rectangles in a plane. (Hint: You may want to make use of your procedures from exercise 5). ...
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1answer
71 views

Encapsulated state in clojure

While going through SICP and trying to implement the code in clojure, I've found that while I can get the code in chapter 3 to work, it seems to go against Clojure idioms, but I can't quite imagine ...
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2answers
92 views

This snippet of scheme calculates a value in pascal's triangle

I'm working through SICP and have implemented exercise 1.11 (Pascal's Triangle). What I'm curious about here is performance considerations by defining functions within the main function. I would ...
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378 views

My first accumulators

Notes I'm working my way through SICP, and as I got very confused by the section on folds, I decided to try to implement foldr in scheme and javascript to understand how it works differently with ...
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SICP ex. 2.42 “eight queens puzzle”

The problem can be found online here. In short, we're given the following function definition, that will recursively generate all the possible solutions for the "eight-queen-problem". ...
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Write a procedure stream-limit that finds

From SICP: Exercise 3.64. Write a procedure stream-limit that takes as arguments a stream and a number (the tolerance). It should examine the stream until it finds two successive elements ...
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152 views

Write a definition of a semaphore in terms of test-and-set! operations

From SICP: Exercise 3.47. A semaphore (of size n) is a generalization of a mutex. Like a mutex, a semaphore supports acquire and release operations, but it is more general in that up to n ...
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156 views

Write a definition of a semaphore in terms of mutexes

From SICP: Exercise 3.47. A semaphore (of size n) is a generalization of a mutex. Like a mutex, a semaphore supports acquire and release operations, but it is more general in that up to n ...
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132 views

Representing a queue as a procedure with local state

From SICP: Exercise 3.22. Instead of representing a queue as a pair of pointers, we can build a queue as a procedure with local state. The local state will consist of pointers to the ...
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1answer
235 views

Examine a list for cycles

From SICP: Exercise 3.18. Write a procedure that examines a list and determines whether it contains a cycle, that is, whether a program that tried to find the end of the list by taking ...
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366 views

Correctly count the number of pairs in an irregular list structure

From SICP: For background, here is exercise 3.16: Exercise 3.16 Ben Bitdiddle decides to write a procedure to count the number of pairs in any list structure. ...
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1answer
243 views

Order of evaluation of function arguments

From SICP: Exercise 3.8 When we defined the evaluation model in section 1.1.3, we said that the first step in evaluating an expression is to evaluate its subexpressions. But we never ...
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Coercion of arguments using successive raising

From SICP: Exercise 2.84 Using the raise operation of exercise 2.83, modify the apply-generic procedure so that it coerces its arguments to have the same type by the method of ...
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Coercion with multiple arguments

From SICP: Exercise 2.82 Show how to generalize apply-generic to handle coercion in the general case of multiple arguments. One strategy is to attempt to coerce all the arguments to ...
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1answer
694 views

Huffman encoding successive-merge function

From SICP: Exercise 2.69. The following procedure takes as its argument a list of symbol-frequency pairs (where no symbol appears in more than one pair) and generates a Huffman encoding ...
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723 views

Encode-symbol for Huffman tree

From the text: Exercise 2.68. The encode procedure takes as arguments a message and a tree and produces the list of bits that gives the encoded message. ...
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1answer
317 views

Search on a binary tree

From SICP: Exercise 2.66. Implement the lookup procedure for the case where the set of records is structured as a binary tree, ordered by the numerical values of the keys. I wrote the ...
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861 views

Union-set intersection-set for a binary-tree implementation of sets

From SICP: Exercise 2.65 Use the results of exercises 2.63 and 2.64 to give (n) implementations of union-set and intersection-set for sets implemented as (balanced) binary trees.41 ...
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1answer
256 views

Adjoin-set for an ordered set representation

From SICP: Exercise 2.61 Give an implementation of adjoin-set using the ordered representation. By analogy with element-of-set? show how to take advantage of the ordering to produce a ...
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1answer
176 views

Set representation allowing duplicates

From SICP: Exercise 2.60. We specified that a set would be represented as a list with no duplicates. Now suppose we allow duplicates. For instance, the set {1,2,3} could be represented as ...
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364 views

Standard Algebraic Derivative Calculator

I had some difficulty with this problem, so I'm sure there is a better way. Here is the question from SICP: Exercise 2.58 Suppose we want to modify the differentiation program so that it ...
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1answer
244 views

Extend sums and products functions

Exercise 2.57. Extend the differentiation program to handle sums and products of arbitrary numbers of (two or more) terms. Then the last example above could be expressed as ...
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1answer
113 views

Extending basic differentiator to handle more kinds of expressions

Exercise 2.56. Show how to extend the basic differentiator to handle more kinds of expressions. For instance, implement the differentiation rule by adding a new clause to the deriv ...
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627 views

Define the equal? predicate

Exercise 2.54 Two lists are said to be equal? if they contain equal elements arranged in the same order. For example, ...
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1answer
217 views

Adding, subtracting, and multiplying a vector by a scalar

Exercise 2.46. A two-dimensional vector v running from the origin to a point can be represented as a pair consisting of an x-coordinate and a y-coordinate. Implement a data abstraction ...
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1answer
165 views

Writing a general purpose “split” function (for SICP's imaginary language)

From SICP 2.2.4: The textbook has already defined a function (right-split ...) as follows: ...
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Eight-queens puzzle

Figure 2.8: A solution to the eight-queens puzzle. The ``eight-queens puzzle'' asks how to place eight queens on a chessboard so that no queen is in check from any other (i.e., no two ...
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Find all distinct triples less than N that sum to S

Exercise 2.41. Write a procedure to find all ordered triples of distinct positive integers i, j, and k less than or equal to a given integer n that sum to a given integer s. ...
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232 views

Defining a unique-pairs procedure

From the section called Nested Mappings Exercise 2.40 Define a procedure unique-pairs that, given an integer n, generates the sequence of pairs (...
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Reverse in terms of fold-right and fold-left

Exercise 2.39 Complete the following definitions of reverse (exercise 2.18) in terms of fold-right and fold-left from exercise 2.38: ...
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1answer
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Matrix multiplication and dot-product

Exercise 2.37. Suppose we represent vectors v = (vi) as sequences of numbers, and matrices m = (mij) as sequences of vectors (the rows of the matrix). For example, the matrix is ...
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Redefine count-leaves as an accumulation

Exercise 2.35. Redefine count-leaves from section 2.2.2 as an accumulation: ...
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1answer
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Abstract tree-map function

Exercise 2.31. Abstract your answer to exercise 2.30 to produce a procedure tree-map with the property that square-tree could be defined as ...
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1answer
228 views

Square-tree using maps and recursion

Define a procedure square-tree analogous to the square-list procedure of exercise 2.21. That is, square-list should behave as follows: ...
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Producing a deep-reverse procedure

Exercise 2.27 Modify your reverse procedure of exercise 2.18 to produce a deep-reverse procedure that takes a list as argument and returns as its value the list with its elements ...
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A definition of for-each

Exercise 2.23 The procedure for-each is similar to map. It takes as arguments a procedure and a list of elements. However, rather than forming a list of the results, for-each just ...
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Filter a list of integers by parity

Exercise 2.20 The procedures +, *, and list take arbitrary numbers of arguments. One way to define such procedures is to use define with dotted-tail notation. In a procedure ...
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Design a procedure to reverse a list

SICP exercise 2.18 asks the following: Exercise 2.18. Define a procedure reverse that takes a list as argument and returns a list of the same elements in reverse order: ...
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A more efficient mul-interval

From 2.11 Exercise 2.11. In passing, Ben also cryptically comments: ``By testing the signs of the endpoints of the intervals, it is possible to break mul-interval into nine cases, only ...
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229 views

Interval Subtraction

From the Extended Exercise beginning in section 2.1.4, you can find exercise 2.8: Exercise 2.8. Using reasoning analogous to Alyssa's, describe how the difference of two intervals may be ...
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803 views

Church Numerals - implement one, two, and addition

Given the following exercise: Exercise 2.6 In case representing pairs as procedures wasn't mind-boggling enough, consider that, in a language that can manipulate procedures, we can ...